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Paper Session 3: Neuroimaging
Moderator
Sarah Fischer
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Presentations
(1) IN VIVO AMYGDALA NUCLEI VOLUMES IN ADOLESCENTS WITH PRIMARY RESTRICTING AND BINGE/PURGE PROFILES 
Lauren Breithaupt1,2, Amanda E. Lyall1,2,3, Clara Odilia Sailer1,2, Avery Van De Water3, Felicia Petterway1, Brynn Vessey3, Danielle L. Khan1, Kendra R. Becker1,2, Jennifer J. Thomas1,2, Franziska Plessow1,2, Laura Holsen2,3, Madhusmita Misra1,2, Elizabeth A. Lawson1,2, Kamryn T. Eddy1,2. 1Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA 2Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA 3Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA
(2) STRUCTURAL CONNECTIVITY WITHIN FRONTOSTRIATAL AND FRONTOLIMBIC BRAIN CIRCUITS IN ANOREXIA NERVOSA
E. Caitlin Lloyd1,2, Karin E. Foerde1,2, Alexandra F. Muratore1,2, Natalie Aw1,2, David Semanek1,2, Jonathan Posner1,2, Joanna Steinglass1,2. 1New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA 2Columbia University Irving Medical Centre, New York, NY, USA
(3) ALTERED NEUROBEHAVIORAL RESPONSES TO ONE-SHOT AND ITERATED SOCIAL INTERACTIONS IN BULIMIA NERVOSA
Carrie J McAdams1, Yi Luo2, Carlisdania Mendoza1, Terry Lohrenz2, Xiaosi Gu3, P. Read Montague2. 1UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA 2Fralin Biomedical Research Institute, Roanoke, VA, USA 3Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, NY
(4) HIGHER BODY DISSATISFACTION IS ASSOCIATED WITH LOWER COGNITIVE FLEXIBILITY AND HIGHER NEURAL ACTIVATION OF THE DORSOLATERAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX IN YOUNG WOMEN WITH EATING DISORDERS CHARACTERIZED BY DIETARY RESTRICTION AND/OR EXCESSIVE EXERCISE
Franziska Plessow1, Poornima Kumar2, Adrienne Romer2, Daifeng Dong2, Meghan Lauze1, Meghan Slattery1, Nadia Micali3, Diego Pizzagalli2, Madhusmita Misra1,4, Kamryn T. Eddy5. 1Neuroendocrine Unit, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA 2Center for Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Research, Department of Psychiatry, McLean Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Belmont, MA, USA 3Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Division, Department of Psychiatry, Geneva University Hospitals and University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland 4Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA 5Eating Disorders Clinical and Research Program, Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
(5) EFFECTS OF AUTISM ON 30-YEAR OUTCOME OF ANOREXIA NERVOSA
Elisabet Wentz1, Sandra Rydberg Dobrescu2, Lisa Dinkler2, Carina Gillberg2, Christopher Gillberg2,3, Maria Råstam 2,4, Søren Nielsen5. 1Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden 2Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden 3Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom 4Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden 5Psychiatric Research Unit, Psychiatry Region Zealand, Slagelse, Denmark