Conference Program

Conference Program

Welcome! Please find the current preliminary program for the 2021 Virtual EDRS Meeting listed below. All times listed are in EDT. Note that any aspect of this program is subject to change and the below program should not be considered final including presentation timings and poster numbers.

All times listed below are in Eastern US Time.



  Fri - Sep 17      Sat - Sep 18      Sun - Sep 19   


Saturday, September 18th

8:00 - 9:30 AM
EARLY CAREER INVESTIGATORS MEETING: RECOGNIZING AND NAVIGATING UNIQUE CHALLENGES FOR WOMEN AND MINORITIES
Chair/Organizer: Kendra Becker, Cheri Levinson
Room 1

Speakers: Eva Trujillo, Christine Peat, Natasha Fowler

This event is open to the public.

9:45 - 11:00 AM
KEYNOTE
Chair/Organizer: Adrienne Juarascio
Room 1

Super-Intensive Experience Sampling of Everyday and Digital Life: Ideas for Discovering Moment-to-Moment Manifestation and Treatment of Dysregulation
Nilam Ram. Stanford University
11:15 - 12:45 PM
SYMPOSIUM: MOVING INTO THE NEXT FRONTIER FOR DIGITAL INTERVENTIONS: NOVEL RESEARCH COLLABORATIONS TO INCREASE REACH AND IMPACT
Chair/Organizer: Andrea Graham, Shiri Sadeh-Sharvit
Room 2

Focusing on stakeholder perspectives to increase engagement: Applying user-centered design methods
Andrea Graham. Northwestern University

Developing effective just-in-time adapted interventions (JITAIs) to enable powerful and precise real-time support for disordered eating
Stephanie Goldstein. Brown University

Leveraging unique partnerships to increase scale of digitally delivered eating disorders interventions
Ellen Fitzsimmons-Craft. Washington University School of Medicine

Reaching underserved populations through web-based dissemination efforts
Erin Accurso. University of California, San Francisco
1:30 - 3:00 PM
PAPER SESSION 1: EPIDEMIOLOGY
Chair/Organizer: Alison Field
Room 1

PREVALENCE OF SYMPTOMATIC DETERIORATION AMONG INDIVIDUALS WITH EATING DISORDERS AND OBESITY: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS
Gianluca Lo Coco1, Lucia Sideli2, Rubinia C. Bonfanti1, Bianca Borsarini3, Cristina Sechi4, Lucia Fortunato1, Nadia Micali3. 1University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.2LUMSA University, Rome, Italy.3Universite de Geneve, Geneva, Switzerland.4University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy

INTERSECTING GENDER IDENTITY AND RACIAL/ETHNIC DISPARITIES IN EATING DISORDER SYMPTOMS AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS: A MULTILEVEL ANALYSIS
Ariel L. Beccia1, 2, Allegra R. Gordon3, 4, 5, Sarah K. Lipson6. 1Clinical and Population Health Research Program, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA.2Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA.3Department of Community Health Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.4Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.5Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.6Department of Health Law Policy and Management, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA

CHILD AUTISTIC TRAITS, EATING PROBLEMS AND NUTRITION-RELATED OUTCOMES IN A POPULATION-BASED COHORT
Holly A. Harris1, Ivonne P. M. Derks1, 2, Pauline W. Jansen1, 2. 1Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.2Erasmus University, Rotterdam, Netherlands

Longitudinal Group and Individual Networks of Eating Disorder Symptoms in Individuals Diagnosed with an Eating Disorder
Cheri A Levinson, Rowan Hunt, Caroline Christian, Brenna M Williams, Ani C Keshishian, Irina A. Vanzhula, Christina Ralph-Nearman. University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA

SEQUENCING OF SYMPTOM EMERGENCE IN ANOREXIA NERVOSA, BULIMIA NERVOSA, BINGE EATING DISORDER, AND PURGING DISORDER AND RELATIONS OF PRODROMAL SYMPTOMS AND RISK FACTORS TO FUTURE ONSET OF THESE DISORDERS
Yuko Yamamiya1, Christopher D. Desjardins2, Eric Stice3. 1Temple University, Japan Campus, Tokyo, Japan.2Saint Michael, Colchester, VT, USA.3Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA

BULLYING AND DISORDERED EATING IN ADOLESCENT GIRLS: EVIDENCE FROM A TWIN STUDY
Lauren Breithaupt1, 2, Baiyu Qi3, Laura M. Thorton3, Paul Lichtenstein4, Sebastian Lundstra#1255m5, Cynthia M. Bulik 3, 4, Melissa A. Munn-Chernoff3. 1Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.2Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.3University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.4Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.5University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden

PAPER SESSION 2: TREATMENT
Chair/Organizer: Jennifer Wildes
Room 2

Using digital health technology to improve skill utilization and acquisition in CBT
Adrienne S Juarascio1, 2, Emily Presseller1, 2, Paakhi Srivastava1, Stephanie Manasse1, Evan Forman1. 1Well Center, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.2Department of Psychology, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA

HOOP TRAINING: A NOVEL TREATMENT APPROACH FOR BODY IMAGE DISTURBANCE IN ANOREXIA NERVOSA
Anouk Keizer1, Manja Engel1, Jose Bonekamp2, Annemarie van Elburg1, 2. 1Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.2Rintveld Centre for Eating Disorders Altrecht, Zeist, Netherlands

EARLY CHANGES IN DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS DURING PSYCHOLOGICAL TREATMENT PREDICT RECOVERY FROM EATING DISORDERS
Glenn Waller1, Peter Chang1, Caroline Bell2, Jaime Delgadillo1. 1University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom.2Freed Beeches Eating Disorders Service, Worksop, United Kingdom

ELEVATED REWARD REGIONS RESPONSIVITY TO THIN MODELS, BUT NOT HIGH CALORIE FOODS, PREDICTS PERSISTENCE OF EATING DISORDER SYMPTOMS: A PROSPECTIVE FMRI STUDY
Sonja Yokum1, Eric Stice2. 1Oregon Research Institute, Eugene, OR, USA.2Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USA

Accountability in Promoting Diversity of Underrepresented Populations in the Eating Disorders Field
Karen Jennings Mathis1, Neha J Goel2, Amy Egbert3, Andrea K Graham4, Lauren E Breithaupt5, Kamryn T. Eddy5, Debra L Franko6. 1University of Rhode Island, South Kingston, RI, USA.2Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.3Brown University, Providence, RI, USA.4Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.5Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA.6Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA

COGNITIVE BEHAVIOR THERAPY AND DIALECTICAL BEHAVIOR THERAPY FOR BINGE EATING DISORDER: WHAT WORKS FOR WHOM?
Mirjam W. Lammers1, 2, Maartje S. Vroling1, 2, Ross D. Crosby3, Tatjana van Strien2. 1GGNet-Amarum, Zutphen, Netherlands.2Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands.3Sanford Center for Bio-Behavioral Research, Fargo, ND, USA
3:15 - 4:45 PM
SYMPOSIUM: ADVANCES IN AVOIDANT/RESTRICTIVE FOOD INTAKE DISORDER (ARFID)
Chair/Organizer: Elizabeth Lawson
Room 3

Neurobiology of ARFID
Jennifer Thomas. Massachusetts General Hospital

Behavioral interventions for young children
William Sharp. Emory University School of Medicine

Family-based treatment for ARFID
James Lock. Stanford University School of Medicine

Discussion
Rachel Bryant-Waugh. NHS UK
5:00 - 6:30 PM
PAPER SESSION 3: NEUROIMAGING
Chair/Organizer: Sarah Fischer
Room 1

IN VIVO AMYGDALA NUCLEI VOLUMES IN ADOLESCENTS WITH PRIMARY RESTRICTING AND BINGE/PURGE PROFILES
Lauren Breithaupt1, 2, Amanda E. Lyall1, 2, 3, Clara Odilia Sailer1, 2, Avery Van De Water3, Felicia Petterway1, Brynn Vessey3, Danielle L. Khan1, Kendra R. Becker1, 2, Jennifer J. Thomas1, 2, Franziska Plessow1, 2, Laura Holsen2, 3, Madhusmita Misra1, 2, Elizabeth A. Lawson1, 2, Kamryn T. Eddy1, 2. 1Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.2Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.3Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA

STRUCTURAL CONNECTIVITY WITHIN FRONTOSTRIATAL AND FRONTOLIMBIC BRAIN CIRCUITS IN ANOREXIA NERVOSA
E. Caitlin Lloyd1, 2, Karin E. Foerde1, 2, Alexandra F. Muratore1, 2, Natalie Aw1, 2, David Semanek1, 2, Jonathan Posner1, 2, Joanna Steinglass1, 2. 1New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA.2Columbia University Irving Medical Centre, New York, NY, USA

ALTERED NEUROBEHAVIORAL RESPONSES TO ONE-SHOT AND ITERATED SOCIAL INTERACTIONS IN BULIMIA NERVOSA
Carrie J McAdams1, Yi Luo2, Carlisdania Mendoza1, Terry Lohrenz2, Xiaosi Gu3, P. Read Montague2. 1UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA.2Fralin Biomedical Research Institute, Roanoke, VA, USA.3Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, NY

Higher body dissatisfaction is associated with lower cognitive flexibility and higher neural activation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in young women with eating disorders characterized by dietary restriction and/or excessive exercise
Franziska Plessow1, Poornima Kumar2, Adrienne Romer2, Daifeng Dong2, Meghan Lauze1, Meghan Slattery1, Nadia Micali3, Diego Pizzagalli2, Madhusmita Misra1, 4, Kamryn T. Eddy5. 1Neuroendocrine Unit, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.2Center for Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Research, Department of Psychiatry, McLean Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Belmont, MA, USA.3Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Division, Department of Psychiatry, Geneva University Hospitals and University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.4Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.5Eating Disorders Clinical and Research Program, Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

EFFECTS OF AUTISM ON 30-YEAR OUTCOME OF ANOREXIA NERVOSA
Elisabet Wentz1, Sandra Rydberg Dobrescu2, Lisa Dinkler2, Carina Gillberg2, Christopher Gillberg2, 3, Maria Rastam 2, 4, Soren Nielsen5. 1Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.2Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.3Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.4Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.5Psychiatric Research Unit, Psychiatry Region Zealand, Slagelse, Denmark

PAPER SESSION 4: BIOLOGY
Chair/Organizer: Debra Franko
Room 2

AVOIDANCE, REWARD, AND FLEXIBILITY (OH MY!): LATENT PROFILE ANALYSIS OF PUTATIVE NEUROCOGNITIVE MAINTENANCE FACTORS IN YOUTH WITH ANOREXIA NERVOSA
C. Alix Timko1, 2, Birkan Tunc1, 2, Amanda Makara2, Marita Cooper2, John Herrington1, 2, Benjamin E. Yerys1, 2. 1Dept. of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine at The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.2Dept. of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA

The Gut Microbiota is Differentially Associated with Weight Outcomes by Bariatric Surgery Type
Kristine Steffen2, Anthony Fodor3, Ian Carroll4, Dale Bond5, Heinberg Leslie1. 1Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA.2North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, USA.3University of North Carolina Charlotte, Charlotte, NC, USA.4University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.5Brown University, Providence, RI, USA

DIFFERENCES IN TASTE (BUT NOT SMELL) PERCEPTION IN AVOIDANT/RESTRICTIVE FOOD INTAKE DISORDER VERSUS HEALTHY CONTROLS
Stephanie G Harshman1, 2, 5, Madeline R Stull1, 2, Megan Kuhnle1, 2, Katherine Holman1, Olivia Wons1, 2, Kristine Hauser1, 2, Susan Erdman6, Madhusmita Misra1, 2, 4, 5, Kamryn T. Eddy1, 2, 3, Nadia Micali7, 8, 9, Elizabeth A Lawson1, 2, 5, Jennifer J Thomas1, 2, 3. 1Neuroendocrine Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.2Eating Disorders Clinical and Research Program, Boston, MA, USA.3Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.4Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.5Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.6Division of Comparative Medicine, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA.7Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health University College London, London, United Kingdom.8Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.9Department of Paediatrics Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland

Shifted autonomic indices prior to loss-of-control eating: A possible biomarker
Lisa M Ranzenhofer1, 2, Soroosh Solhjoo3, E. Caitlin Lloyd1, 2, Sharath Koorathota4, Brittany H. Kim1, 2, B. Timothy Walsh1, 2, Mark Haigney3. 1New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA.2Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.3Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA.4Columbia University, New York, NY, USA

EXAMINING REWARD VALUATION DIFFERENCES IN ANOREXIA NERVOSA BINGE-PURGE SUBTYPE AND BULIMIA NERVOSA
Sophie R. Abber1, 2, Austin Starkey3, Chloe Halfhide3, Jonathan Appelbaum4, Diana L. Williams4, Pamela K. Keel3. 1Department of Psychology, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.2WELL Center, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.3Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA.4Department of Clinical Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA