Conference Program

Conference Program

Welcome! Please find the current preliminary program for the 2020 Virtual EDRS Meeting listed below. All times listed are in EDT. Note that any aspect of this program is subject to change and the below program should not be considered final including presentation timings and poster numbers.

All times listed below are in Eastern US Time.



  Mon - Oct 12      Tue - Oct 13      Wed - Oct 14      Thu - Oct 15      Fri - Oct 16   


Friday, October 16th

10:00 - 11:30 AM
LIVE SESSION - MEETING: YOUNG INVESTIGATORS MEETING
Chair/Organizer: Kamryn Eddy, Debra Franko
Virtual Meeting

Calling all Early Stage Investigators for a Discussion at EDRS on how the next generation in our field are working to —and can continue to—increase racial and ethnic diversity of representation in our field. Join us for three flash talks from Dr. Amy Egbert, Dr. Karen Jennings Mathis, and Ms. Neha Goel, followed by group discussion of key questions. The goal of the forum is to address how to increase diversity of representation both in our clinical research and in our colleagues. Structurally, presenters will give 5-10 minute talks on their own work addressing the overarching issue; we will then have breakout rooms to discuss these key areas; and finally, we will come together to share ideas and plan for a product (e.g., consensus paper, plenary for next year’s EDRS meeting). Note that this Discussion will be a live event; it will not be recorded.

12:00 - 1:30 PM
LIVE SESSION - PLENARY SESSION: TOP ABSTRACTS SESSION
Virtual Meeting

This session includes oral presentations from the top scoring abstracts.


12:00
CLINICAL DESCRIPTION OF A PEDIATRIC SAMPLE WITH AVOIDANT/RESTRICTIVE FOOD INTAKE DISORDER
Ricarda Schmidt1, Franziska Schlensog-Schuster2, Andreas Hiemisch3, 4, Wieland Kiess3, 4, Anja Hilbert1. 1Leipzig University Medical Center, Integrated Research and Treatment Center AdiposityDiseases, Behavioral Medicine Research Unit, Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, Leipzig, Germany.2Leipzig University Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics for Children and Adolescents, Leipzig, Germany.3University of Leipzig, LIFE Leipzig Research Centre for Civilization Diseases, Leipzig, Germany.4Leipzig University Medical Center, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Centre for Pediatric Research, Leipzig, Germany

12:15
Types of Eating Disorder Symptoms in Adolescence: The Role of Decision Making in Childhood
Amy Harrison, Marta Francesconi, Eirini Flouri. University College London, London, United Kingdom

12:30
Randomized Controlled Trial of Guided-Self-Help Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Treatments for Loss-of-Control Eating Following Bariatric Surgery
Valentina Ivezaj1, Ralitza Gueorguieva2, Andrew Duffy1, Carlos Grilo1. 1Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.2Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA

12:45
THE IMPACT OF COVID-19 ON EATING DISORDERS: A FIVE-MONTH REVIEW.
Rachael E. Flatt1, Jet D. Termorshuizen2, 3, Hunna J. Watson1, 4, 5, Laura M. Thornton1, Stina Borg2, Casey M. MacDermod1, Lauren E. Harper1, Bengt Fundin2, Andreas Birgegard2, Eric F. van Furth3, 6, Christine M. Peat1, Cynthia M. Bulik1, 2, 7. 1Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.2Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.3Rivierduinen Eating Disorders Ursula, Leiden, Netherlands.4School of Psychology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.5School of Paediatrics, Division of Medicine, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.6Department of Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands.7Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA

1:00
Short-term outcomes of higher calorie refeeding in hospitalized patients with atypical anorexia nervosa: findings from the Study of Refeeding to Optimize iNpatient Gains (StRONG)
Andrea K Garber1, Jing Cheng2, Erin C. Accurso 3, Sally H. Adams 1, Sara M. Buckelew1, Cynthia J. Kapphahn4, Anna Kreiter4, Daniel Le Grange1, 3, 5, Vanessa I. Machen 1, Anna-Barbara Moscicki6, Neville H. Golden 4. 1University of California San Francisco, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent Medicine, San Francisco, CA, USA.2University of California San Francisco, Department of Preventive a Restorative Dental Sciences, San Francisco, CA, USA.3University of California, Department of Psychiatry, San Francisco, CA, USA.4Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford CA. f Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine, University of Californi, Stanford, CA, USA.5Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, the University of Chicago, IL (Emeritus), Chicago, IL, USA.6Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, Los Angeles, CA, USA

1:15
EXPLORING THE PHENOME-WIDE CONSEQUENCES OF ANOREXIA NERVOSA ASSOCIATED GENES
Jessica S Johnson1, Amanda Dobbyn1, Alanna Cote1, Liam Cotter1, Alex Charney1, 2, Laura Huckins1, 2. 1Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.2James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA