Conference Program

Conference Program

Welcome! Please find the current preliminary program for the 2020 Virtual EDRS Meeting listed below. All times listed are in EDT. Note that any aspect of this program is subject to change and the below program should not be considered final including presentation timings and poster numbers.

All times listed below are in Eastern US Time.



  Mon - Oct 12      Tue - Oct 13      Wed - Oct 14      Thu - Oct 15      Fri - Oct 16   


Thursday, October 15th

10:00 - 1:00 PM
LIVE SESSION - WORKSHOP: INNOVATIVE TREATMENT APPROACHES
Virtual Conference

New approaches to the treatment of eating disorders are needed to enhance efficacy and scope. In this workshop, selected areas of innovative treatment approaches will be introduced and illustrated with brief presentations, in order to stipulate discussion and networking. As an example of Technology-supported treatment, Bianka Vollert (Germany) will present on bridging the waiting time of patients with bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder by using a web-based intervention. José Gutiérrez Maldonado (Spain) will present on new developments in Virtual reality for the treatment of eating disorders, specifically anorexia nervosa, including virtual reality-based body exposure therapy, the use of avatars, and embodiment procedures. Advances in neuroscience have enriched our understanding of underlying neurocircuitry in eating disorders and inform the development of Brain-directed interventions such as neuromodulation; Bethan Dalton (UK) will present on repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for chronic anorexia nervosa. Combination treatments may represent an approach to optimize efficacy for eating disorders and comorbid disorders. Philippa Hay (Australia) will speak about the combination of interventions for obesity targeting weight loss and eating disorders. An under-researched area is the Treatment of feeding and eating disorders in children and adolescents. Jennifer Thomas (USA) will present on cognitive-behavioral therapy for avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder in children and adolescents as well as adults.

12:00 - 3:00 PM
LIVE SESSION - WORKSHOP: RESEARCH ON NEUROSCIENCES AND COGNITION
Chair/Organizer: Kamryn Eddy
Virtual Meeting

Learning Objectives: Be able to discuss the latest multi-modal neuroimaging findings in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. Identify and problem-solve around common methodological challenges that arise in neuroimaging research and consider how to apply in your own research. Generate new research ideas, directions, and collaborations with investigators across the globe. To see full abstracts, please go here: https://edresearchsociety.org/2020/program-workshops.php

4:00 - 5:30 PM
LIVE SESSION - SYMPOSIUM: WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES AND MODELS
Chair/Organizer: Tracey Wade
Virtual Meeting

Neuroendocrine correlates of childhood trauma exposure: Implications for pathophysiology and treatment of eating disorders: Palmiero Monteleone. Exposure to childhood maltreatment may be associated with long-lasting changes in brain areas involved in the perception of the own body, reward processing and taste processing as well as with changes in the functioning of the endogenous stress response system. These changes may moderate the relationship between early trauma exposure and the risk to develop an eating disorder, as well as affecting clinical response to treatments. We need of new treatment interventions specifically focusing on trauma-related aspects Neurosciences and Brain in Psychiatric Disorders: Guido Frank. Neuroscience is the study of the nervous system and how it relates to behavior, perception, and learning. This field has made tremendous contributions to our understanding of psychiatric disorders in the recent past. This presentation will highlight the importance of the neuroscientific approach to understand and model psychiatric illnesses, and how neuroscience methods can be applied to advance neurobiological research and treatment of eating disorders. Autistic Spectrum Disorders: Kate Tchanturia. We need to pay more attention to ASD comorbidity with eating disorders and better understand how comorbidity impacts on treatment development and effectiveness. There is a need to translate research findings in clinical practice to provide better care for this complex patient group. Addictive disorders and Behavioral Addiction: Astrid Müller. The presentation will provide information about behavioral addictions in the ICD-11. It will address the importance of addiction-like responses to highly palatable, processed food in the development and maintenance of unhealthy eating habits. A recent, comprehensive model of addictive behaviors will be introduced and applied to certain types of eating disorders.


3:00
Introduction
Tracey Wade. Flinders University

3:05
Neuroendocrine correlates of childhood trauma exposure: Implications for pathophysiology and treatment of eating disorders
Palmiero Monteleone. University of Salerno

3:25
Neurosciences and Brain in Psychiatric Disorders
Guido Frank. University of California San Diego

3:45
Autistic Spectrum Disorders
Kate Tchanturia. King's College

4:05
Addictive disorders and Behavioral Addictions
Astrid Mueller. Hanover Medical School
6:00 - 7:00 PM
LIVE SESSION - KEYNOTE: KEYNOTE
Virtual Meeting

This talk aims to consider the utility of applying an addiction framework to disordered eating. The role of transdiagnostic mechanisms in addictive and eating disorders are discussed. A review of the existing literature on the role of an addiction phenotype in disordered eating is reviewed and gaps in our scientific understanding are highlighted. Potential clinical implications of an addiction framework will be reviewed.


Food Addiction: Can this model contribute to eating disorders field?
Ashley Gearhardt. University of Michigan
7:30 - 9:00 PM
LIVE SESSION - PARALLEL PAPER SESSION: PAPER SESSION 4: CLINICAL/PSYCHOPATHOLOGY
Virtual Meeting

7:30
EFFECTS OF THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC ON BINGE-RELATED PATHOLOGY IN WOMEN: A 49-DAY STUDY OF RISK BEFORE AND DURING THE OUTBREAK IN THE USA
Kelly L. Klump1, Megan Mikhail1, Natasha Fowler1, S. Alexandra Burt1, Michael C. Neale2, Pamela K. Keel3, Jason Moser1, Ashley N. Gearhardt4, Debra K. Katzman5, Cheryl L. Sisk1. 1Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.2Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.3Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA.4University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.5University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

7:45
DRIVE FOR THINNESS PROVIDES AN ALTERNATIVE, MORE MEANINGFUL, SEVERITY INDICATOR THAN THE DSM-5 SEVERITY INDICES FOR EATING DISORDERS
Isabel Krug1, An Binh Dang1, Roser Granero2, Zaida Aguera3, Isabel Sanchez3, Nadine Riesco3, Susana Jimenez Murcia3, Jose Menchon3, Fernando Fernandez-Aranda3. 1The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.2Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.3University Hospital of Bellvitge-IDIBELL, Barceona, Spain

8:00
Development of transdiagnostic clinical risk prediction models for 12-month onset and course of eating disorders among adolescents in the community: A pilot study
Deborah Mitchison1, Shirley Wang2, Tracey Wade3, Ann Haynos4, Phillipa Hay1. 1Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia.2Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA.3Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia.4University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MA, USA

8:15
THE ROLE OF LIFE-EVENTS IN RECOVERY FROM EATING DISORDERS IN EMERGING ADULTS WITH FIRST-EPISODE ILLNESS
Rachel Potterton1, Karina Allen1, 2, Tirril Harris3, Ulrike Schmidt1, 2. 1Section of Eating Disorders, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.2The Eating Disorders Service, Maudsley Hospital, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.3Department of Health Services and Population Research, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom

8:30
EATING BEHAVIOR AND SYMPTOM TRAJECTORIES IN PATIENTS WITH BINGE EATING DISORDER DURING COVID-19-PANDEMIC
Kathrin Schag, Marisa Schurr, Stephan Zipfel, Florian Junne, Katrin Giel. Medical University Hospital Tubingen, Tubingen, Germany

8:45
RACIAL COMPOSITION OF U.S. COLLEGES RELATES TO EATING DISORDER RISK AND PREVALENCE IN FEMALE STUDENTS
Melissa M. Vazquez1, Ellen E. Fitzsimmons-Craft1, Lauren A. Fowler1, Jilian Shah1, Andrea K. Graham2, Shiri Sadeh-Sharvit3, 4, 5, Katherine N. Balantekin6, Grace E. Monterubio1, Marie-Laure Firebaugh1, Mickey T. Trockel3, C. Barr Taylor3, 4, Denise E. Wilfley1. 1Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA.2Department of Medical Social Sciences, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.3Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.4Center for m2Health, Palo Alto University, Palo Alto, CA, USA.5Baruch Ivcher School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya, Israel.6Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA