Conference Program

Conference Program

Welcome! Please find the current preliminary program for the 2020 Virtual EDRS Meeting listed below. All times listed are in EDT. Note that any aspect of this program is subject to change and the below program should not be considered final including presentation timings and poster numbers.

All times listed below are in Eastern US Time.



  Mon - Oct 12      Tue - Oct 13      Wed - Oct 14      Thu - Oct 15      Fri - Oct 16   


Wednesday, October 14th

10:00 - 11:00 AM
LIVE SESSION - KEYNOTE: KEYNOTE
Virtual Meeting

Ever had a "gut feeling" about something? It turns out, the connection between our gut and our brain might be stronger than we think. In this Keynote, John F. Cryan will share surprising facts and insights about how our thoughts and emotions are connected to our guts. He will shares his fascination with biomedicine and why it offers a perfect way to explore the interaction between the brain, gut and microbiome, and how this relationship applies to a variety of mental and metabolic disorders. He will question whether we are at the beginning of a new era in how we understand the relationship between food, mood and brain health – a ‘Psychobiotic Revolution’.


Gut Microbiota and Brain
John Cryan.
11:30 - 1:00 PM
LIVE SESSION - SYMPOSIUM: DIGITALLY ENHANCED INTERVENTIONS FOR PATIENTS WITH EATING AND WEIGHT DISORDERS: EMERGING CHANCES AND CHALLENGES
Virtual Meeting

Evidence-based effective approaches for the identification of eating and weight disorders, their prevention and treatment have been increasingly developed and implemented – however, they are for several reasons not equally available and effective for all affected individuals, representing a current limitation and future challenges in eating disorder research. Digital intervention and dissemination approaches have the potential to target this problem. We have developed a treatment approach that overcomes discontinuity of care in severe anorexia nervosa by offering psychotherapy after inpatient treatment via videoconference for sustained recovery in a patient group at increased risk for relapse. We present data on acceptance and feasibility from a pilot trial and present the study design of an ongoing large RCT in which we investigate the efficacy of this novel digitally enhanced intervention as compared to treatment as usual.


1
Introduction
Katrin Giel. Medical University Hospital Tubingen

2
Digital Technology to Reduce the Prevalence of Eating Disorders in Populations: Time for a New Approach
Ellen Fitzsimmons-Craft. Washington University School of Medicine

3
The effectiveness of an Internet-based intervention with expert patient support in individuals with an eating disorder
Alexandra Dingemans. Rivierduinen Eating Disorders Ursula

4
Specialized post-inpatient psychotherapy for sustained recovery in anorexia nervosa via videoconference (SUSTAIN)
Katrin Giel. University Hospital Tubingen
1:30 - 3:00 PM
LIVE SESSION - PARALLEL PAPER SESSION: PAPER SESSION 3: NEUROCOGNITION
Virtual Meeting

1:30
PATIENTS WITH EARLY-ONSET ANOREXIA NERVOSA DISPLAY ABERRANT DEVELOPMENTAL TRAJECTORIES OF COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE
Angela Favaro1, 2, Enrico Collantoni1, Paolo Meneguzzo1, Elena Tenconi1, 2. 1Department Neuroscience, Padova, Italy.2Padova Neuroscience Center (PNC), Padova, Italy

1:45
COULD IMPULSIVITY, EMOTIONAL DYSREGULATION AND EXECUTIVE FUNCTION DEFICITS INCREASE THE RISK OF DEVELOPING ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE IN EATING DISORDERS?
Maria Lozano-Madrid1, 2, 3, Danielle Clark Bryan4, Roser Granero3, 5, Isabel Sanchez1, 2, 3, Nadine Riesco1, 2, 3, Nuria Mallorqui-Bague3, 6, Susana Jimenez-Murcia1, 2, 3, 7, Janet Treasure4 , Fernando Fernandez-Aranda1, 2, 3, 7. 1Department of Psychiatry, Bellvitge University Hospital-IDIBELL, Barcelona, Spain.2Psychiatry and Mental Health Group, Neuroscience Program, Institut d, Barcelona, Spain.3Ciber Fisiopatologia Obesidad y Nutricion (CIBERobn), Instituto Salud Carlos III, Barcelona, Spain.4Section of Eating Disorders, Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.5Departament de Psicobiologia i Metodologia. Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.6Addictive Behavior Unit, Department of Psychiatry, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Biomedical Research Institute Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain.7Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain

2:00
A mixed-methods study investigating interpersonal functioning and cognitive biases towards social stimuli in adolescents with eating disorders and healthy peers
Katie P Rowlands1, Silvia Cerea2, Emma Wilson3, Ben Grafton4, Mima Simic5, Robyn Yellowlees1, Amy Harrison6, Colette Hirsch7, Janet Treasure1, Valentina Cardi2. 1Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.2Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.3Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology a Neuroscience, King, London, United Kingdom.4Centre for the Advancement of Research on Emotion, School of Psychological Science, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia.5Child and Adolescent Eating Disorders Service, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.6Department of Psychology and Human Development, University College London, Institute of Education, 25 Woburn Square, London, United Kingdom.7Psychology Department, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom

2:15
WHEN THE GOING GETS RIGID: CLINICAL AND NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL CORRELATES OF FLEXIBILITY IN PATIENTS WITH ANOREXIA NERVOSA AND OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE DISORDER
Unna N. Danner1, 2, Lot C. Sternheim2, Boris van Passel3, Alexandra E. Dingemans4, Danielle C. Cath5, 6. 1Altrecht Eating Disorders Rintveld, Zeist, Netherlands.2Department of Clinical Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.3Overwaal Center for Anxiety Disorders, OCD, and PTSD, Pro Persona Institute for Integrated Mental Health Care, Nijmegen, Netherlands.4Rivierduinen Eating Disorders Ursula, Leiden, Netherlands.5Altrecht Academic Anxiety Center, Utrecht, Netherlands.6GGz Drenthe, Department of Specialist Training, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen and University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Psychiatry, Groningen, Netherlands

2:30
CLINICAL AND NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS OF AUTISTIC TRAITS IN ANOREXIA NERVOSA. EFFECTS ON ILLNESS OUTCOME AND THE SPECIFIC ROLE OF BODY WEIGHT.
Elena Tenconi1, 2, Meneguzzo Paolo1, Collantoni Enrico1, Zanetti Tatiana1, Favaro Angela1, 2. 1Department of Neuroscience, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.2Padova Neuroscience Center, Padova, Italy

2:45
Constricted affect during an eating task is moderated by surprise in adolescent females with low weight eating disorders
Trevor C Griffen1, Stephanie E Millot1, Robyn Sysko1, Kurt Schulz1, Daniela Schiller1, 2, Tom Hildebrandt1. 1Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.2Department of Neuroscience, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA