Conference Program

Conference Program

Welcome! Please find the current preliminary program for the 2020 Virtual EDRS Meeting listed below. All times listed are in EDT. Note that any aspect of this program is subject to change and the below program should not be considered final including presentation timings and poster numbers.

All times listed below are in Eastern US Time.



  Mon - Oct 12      Tue - Oct 13      Wed - Oct 14      Thu - Oct 15      Fri - Oct 16   


Tuesday, October 13th

4:00 - 5:30 PM
LIVE SESSION - SYMPOSIUM: VALUE OF EATING DISORDER TREATMENT AND FUTURE CHALLENGES
Chair/Organizer: Fernando Fernandez-Aranda
Virtual Meeting

1
Introduction
Fernando Fernandez-Aranda1, 2. 1University of Barcelona .2University Hospital of Bellvitge

2
Value of Treatment: European Project
Janet Treasure. King's College London

3
Early Interventions: does age matter?
Beate Herpertz-Dahlmann. University Hospital Aachen

4
Mind the Research Gaps: Developing an International Research Strategy that Drives Better Prevention and Treatment Outcomes
Tracey Wade. Flinders University

5
Discussion
Philip Gorwood1, 2. 1Sainte-Anne Hospital .2University of Paris
6:00 - 7:00 PM
LIVE SESSION - KEYNOTE: KEYNOTE
Virtual Meeting

This presentation will focus on the biology underlying anorexia nervosa. Relative to the past, I will review recent literature on the heritability of brain disorders, emphasizing the growing consensus that the current DSM formulation of anorexia nervosa does not really describe a distinct brain disorder, and that we need to reconceptualize our diagnostic approach. I will also review the recent AN GWAS findings, and then briefly cover biological factors, ranging from genetics to hormonal changes to brain imaging findings that are currently being explored. Last, I will emphasize that further research examining alterations in metabolic processes, including systems ranging from bile acids and short chain fatty acids to gut microbiota and brain gut communication, require heightened research attention.


Learning from the Past to Meet the Challenges of the Future
James Mitchell. Professor Emeritus, University of North Dakota
7:30 - 8:45 PM
LIVE SESSION - PARALLEL PAPER SESSION: PAPER SESSION 2: BIOLOGICAL/RISK FACTORS
Virtual Meeting

7:30
GUT MICROBIOTA ALTERATIONS IN ADOLESCENTS WITH ANOREXIA NERVOSA DO NOT NORMALIZE FOLLOWING SHORT-TERM WEIGHT RESTORATION
Jochen Seitz1, Meriem Belheouane2, Nina Schulz1, Astrid Dempfle3, John Baines2, Beate Herpertz-Dahlmann1. 1Clinic of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Aachen, Germany.2Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, PlApn, Germany.3Institute of Medical Informatics and Statistics, Kiel University, Kiel, Germany

7:45
CHILDREN AT HIGH-RISK FOR EATING DISORDERS: A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF BIOMARKERS
Edoardo Pappaianni1, Manuela Barona2, Gaelle Doucet3, Sophia Frangou4, Christopher Clark2, Nadia Micali1, 2, 5. 1Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.2UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, London, United Kingdom.3Boys Town National Research Hospital (BTNRH), Omaha, NE, USA.4Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.5Depatment of Pediatrics, Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland

8:00
Neurobiological underpinning of eating disorder behaviours and diagnoses: Integrative biopsychosocial longitudinal analyses in adolescents and emerging adults from both population-based and clinical cohort studies.
Lauren Robinson, Marina Bobou, Zuo Zhang , Sylvane Desrivieres , Ulrike Schmidt . Kings College London, London, United Kingdom

8:15
EXPLORING GENETIC ARCHITECTURE OF ANOREXIA NERVOSA: DEFINING THE GENOMIC FACTOR STRUCTURE OF ANXIETY-RELATED AND ANTHROPOMETRIC TRAITS
Katherine E Schaumberg1, Zeynep Yilmaz2, Cynthia M Bulik2, 3, Nadia Micali4. 1University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA.2University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.3Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.4Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland

8:30
DISORDERED EATING IN CONTEXT: SOCIOECONOMIC DISADVANTAGE INCREASES RISK AND IMPACTS THE ETIOLOGY OF DISORDERED EATING IN YOUTH
Megan E. Mikhail1, Sarah L. Carroll1, D. Angus Clark2, Shannon O'Conner3, S. Alexandra Burt1, Kelly L. Klump1. 1Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.2University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.3University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA