Conference Program

Conference Program

Welcome! Please find the current preliminary program for EDRS 2019 listed below. Note that any aspect of this program is subject to change and the below program should not be considered final including presentation timings and poster numbers.


9
  Fri - Sep 06      Sat - Sep 07      Sun - Sep 08   

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2019


7:30 - 8:15 AM
PLENARY SESSION
OPEN SCIENCE PRACTICES IN EATING DISORDER RESEARCH: OPPORTUNITIES, CHALLENGES, AND POSSIBLE GUIDELINES
Chicago 9/10

Open Science is a global movement to increase the accessibility to scientific research in order to foster collaboration and innovation, increase scientific rigor and reproducibility, encourage data integration, and accelerate the translation of basic research into clinical practice. Increasingly, funders demand Open Science practices, and scientific journals are following suit. These requirements pose logistical burdens and raise ethical or intellectual property concerns. EDRS members should shape the future of Open Science in our field. Two brief talks will set the stage to engage EDRS attendees in a discussion of the Open Science framework and offer practical strategies for increasing transparency and reproducibility in eating disorder research. Weissman will introduce the Open Science framework, provide examples of specific rigor and reproducibility criteria, and summarize findings of a study of open science practices as reflected in manuscripts published in three eating disorder journals. An important component of Open Science is data sharing. Crosby, based on extensive collaborative experience across the globe, will share practical guidelines and tips regarding sharing data. The presenters then will facilitate audience discussion of how our field should address the opportunities and challenges arising from the Open Science movement and of possible guidelines for protecting investigators and participants from misuse or unintended consequences of open science practices.


8:30 - 10:00 AM
SYMPOSIUM
NEW DIRECTIONS IN EATING DISORDERS TREATMENT RESEARCH
Chair/Organizer: Jennifer Wildes
Chicago 9/10

10:00 - 10:30 AM
BREAK
COFFEE BREAK
Chicago Ballroom Foyer

10:30 - 12:00 PM
SYMPOSIUM
WHAT WE’RE MISSING IN EATING DISORDERS RESEARCH (AND PREVENTION, TREATMENT AND ADVOCACY): THE EPIDEMIOLOGIST’S PERSPECTIVE
Chair/Organizer: Alexis Duncan
Chicago 9/10


MANY PEOPLE WITH EATING DISORDERS DON’T RECEIVE TREATMENT (AND PEOPLE WITH EDS WHO RECEIVE TREATMENT ARE DIFFERENT FROM THOSE WHO DO NOT).
Ruth Weissman. Wesleyan University


MOST PEOPLE WITH EATING DISORDERS ARE NOT UNDERWEIGHT, NOR ARE THEY ADOLESCENT GIRLS
Alexis Duncan. The Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis


THE VAST MAJORITY OF PEOPLE WITH EATING DISORDERS HAVE OTHER PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS
Kristin von Ranson. University of Calgary


IT IS UNLIKELY THAT THE ED DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA REPRESENT “THE TRUTH”
Alison Field. Brown University School of Public Health


THE PREVALENCE OF EATING DISORDERS AND DISORDERED EATING IS MUCH HIGHER THAN WE THINK
Katie Loth. University of Minnesota


SUB-DIAGNOSTIC DISORDERED EATING MATTERS
Dianne Neumark-Sztainer. University of Minnesota


YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE A (MENTAL) HEALTHCARE PROVIDER TO DO SOMETHING ABOUT EDS
S. Bryn Austin. Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health


SUMMARY
Carly Pacanowski. University of Delaware


DISCUSSION
Kendrin Sonneville. University of Michigan, School of Public Health

12:00 - 1:00 PM
KEYNOTE
KEYNOTE
Chicago 9/10


THE NEW PARADIGM OF COMPUTATIONAL PSYCHIATRY
David Redish. University of Minnesota

1:00 - 2:15 PM
BREAK
LUNCH (ON YOUR OWN)
Chicago Ballroom Foyer

2:15 - 3:30 PM
PARALLEL PAPER SESSION
PARALLEL PAPER SESSION I: BINGE EATING AND OBESITY
Chicago 10


DIALECTICAL BEHAVIOR THERAPY (DBT) GUIDED SELF-HELP FOR BINGE-EATING DISORDER (BED): A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Jacqueline C. Carter1, Therese E. Kenny1, 2, Christopher W. Singleton1, Megan Van Wijk1, Olga Heath1. 1Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NL, Canada. 2University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada


THE INTERACTIVE EFFECTS OF LOW TESTOSTERONE AND PROLONGED STRESS ON BINGE EATING SYMPTOMS IN MEN
Kristen M. Culbert, Megan M. Shope, Kimberly S. Stevens. Department of Psychology, University of Nevada - Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV, USA


PSYCHOPATHOLOGICAL NETWORKS IN COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL TREATMENTS FOR BINGE-EATING DISORDER
Anja Hilbert1, Andreas Mayr2, Stephan Herpertz3, Stephan Zipfel4, Brunna Tuschen-Caffier5, Hans-Christoph Friederich6, Martina de Zwaan7. 1University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany. 2University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany. 3University of Bochum, Bochum, Germany. 4University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany. 5University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. 6University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf, Germany. 7Hanover Medical School, Hanover, Germany


EXPLORING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A SELF-CONTROL TRAINING ON TOP OF INPATIENT TREATMENT, FOR IMPROVING WEIGHT LOSS AND EATING BEHAVIOR IN OBESE YOUNGSTERS
Tiffany Naets1, Leentje Vervoort1, Eline Vermeiren2, Annelies Van Eyck2, Ann Tanghe3, Caroline Braet1. 1Ghent University - Developmental, Personality and Social Psychology, Ghent, Belgium. 2Antwerp University - Pediatrics, Antwerp, Belgium. 3Zeepreventorium vzw, De Haan, Belgium


DIFFICULTY PUTTING ON THE BREAKS: NEURAL ACTIVATION DIFFERS BY BINGE EATING STATUS IN INDIVIDUALS WITH OBESITY WHEN ATTEMPTING TO INHIBIT RESPONSES TO FOOD 
Megan N. Parker1, Helen B. Murray1, Stephanie M. Manasse3, Amani Piers1, Alexandra F. Muratore1, Michael R. Lowe1, Hasan Ayaz2, Adrienne S. Juarascio1, 3. 1Department of Clinical Psychology Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. 2School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. 3Center for Weight, Eating and Lifestyle Science (WELL Center), Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA


PARALLEL PAPER SESSION II: DIETARY INTAKE AND BIOLOGY OF RESTRICTIVE EATING DISORDERS
Chicago 9


ALTERED MICRONUTRIENT LEVELS IN ANOREXIA NERVOSA: A PRELIMINARY STUDY ON THE POSSIBLE MEDIATING ROLE OF DNA METHYLATION
Linda Booij1, 2, 3, Jessica Burdo3, 4, Esther Kahan4, Luis B Agellon3, Lea Thaler3, 4, Kevin McGregor3, Aurelie Labbe5, Mimi Israel3, 4, Linda Wykes3, Howard Steiger 3, 4. 1Concordia University, Montreal, QC, Canada. 2CHU Sainte-Justine Hospital, Montreal, QC, Canada. 3McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. 4Eating Disorders Program, Douglas Universsity Institute, Montreal, QC, Canada. 5HEC Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada


REDUCED PLASMA OREXIN-A CONCENTRATIONS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH COGNITIVE DEFICITS IN ANOREXIA NERVOSA
Fernando Fernandez-Aranda1, 2, 3, Trevor Steward1, 2, Gemma Mestre-Bach1, 2, Susana Jimenez-Murcia1, 2, 3, Roser Granero2, 4, Isabel Sanchez1, 2, Nadine Riesco1, 2, Cristina Vintro-Alcaraz1, 2, Zaida Aguera1, 2, Jose M. Menchon5. 1Department of Psychiatry, Bellvitge University Hospital-IDIBELL, Barcelona, Spain. 2Ciber Fisiopatologia Obesidad y Nutricion, Instituto Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain. 3Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. 4Departament de Psicobiologia i Metodologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. 5CIBER Salud Mental, Instituto Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain


A DIET HIGH IN PROCESSED FOODS, TOTAL AND ADDED SUGARS, AND LOW IN PROTEIN IS CHARACTERISTIC OF YOUTH WITH AVOIDANT/RESTRICTIVE FOOD INTAKE DISORDER
Stephanie G Harshman1, 2, Olivia Wons1, 2, Madeline S Rogers1, 2, Alyssa M Izquierdo1, 2, Tara M Holmes3, Reitumetse L Pulumo1, 2, Elisa Asanza1, 2, Kamryn Eddy1, 2, 4, Madhusmita Misra1, Nadia Micali5, 6, 7, 8, Elizabeth A Lawson1, Jennifer J Thomas2, 4. 1Neuroendocrine Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. 2Eating Disorders Clinical and Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. 3Translational Clinical Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. 4Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. 5Departement universitaire de psychiatrie, Universite de Geneve, Geneva, Switzerland. 6Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom. 7Service de psychiatrie de l'enfant et de l'adolescent, Geneva, Switzerland. 8Department of Pediatrics, Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland


FAT PREFERENCE AND FAT INTAKE IN INDIVIDUALS WITH AND WITHOUT ANOREXIA NERVOSA
Janet E. Schebendach, Blair Uniacke, B. Timothy Walsh, Laurel E. S. Mayer, Evelyn Attia, Joanna Steinglass. NYS Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University Medical Center, NY, NY, USA


THE ROLE OF FRONTOSTRIATAL CIRCUITS IN RESTRICTIVE FOOD CHOICE ACROSS THE SPECTRUM FROM ILLNESS TO HEALTH
Joanna E Steinglass1, 2, Karin Foerde1, 2, Janet Schebendach1, 2, B. Timothy Walsh1, 2, Daphna Shohamy3. 1Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. 2New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA. 3Columbia University, New York, NY, USA

3:30 - 4:00 PM
BREAK
COFFEE BREAK
Chicago Ballroom Foyer

4:00 - 5:15 PM
PARALLEL PAPER SESSION
PARALLEL PAPER SESSION III: INTERVENTIONS
Chicago 10


ENHANCED COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY FOR ADOLESCENTS WITH ANOREXIA NERVOSA: OUTCOME AND PREDICTORS OF CHANGE
Riccardo Dalle Grave, Massimiliano Sartirana, Simona Calugi. Villa Garda Hospital, Garda (VR), Italy


ONLINE IMAGINAL EXPOSURE THERAPY FOR EATING DISORDERS DECREASES EATING DISORDER SYMPTOMS, FEAR OF FOOD, AND CORE EATING DISORDER FEARS
Cheri A Levinson, Caroline Christian, Shruti Shankar-Ram, Irina A Vanzhula, Leigh C Brosof, Lisa Michelson, Brebba Williams. University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA


IMPROVING PSYCHOLOGICAL OUTCOMES FOR CARERS OF ADULTS WITH ANOREXIA NERVOSA VIA A WEB-BASED SKILLS PACKAGE: A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Lucy E Spencer1, Juliane Schmidt-Hantke2, Karina Allen1, 5, Peter Musiat1, Rachel Potterton1, Gemma Gordon1, Franziska Hager2, Beintner Ina2, Bianka Vollert2, Barbara Nacke2, Dennis Gorlich3, Jennifer Beecham4, Eva-Maria Bonin4, Corinna Jacobi2, Ulrike Schmidt1, 5. 1King's College London, London, United Kingdom. 2Technische Universitat Dresden, Dresden, Germany. 3Wilhelms-Universitat Munster, Munster, Germany. 4London School of Economics and Political Science, London, United Kingdom. 5The Eating Disorders Service, Maudsley Hospital, London, United Kingdom


PROJECT RECOVER: RESULTS OF A FIRST RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF INTEGRATED COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL THERAPY FOR CO-OCCURRING EATING DISORDERS AND POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER
Kathryn Trottier1, 2, Candice Monson3, Stephen A. Wonderlich4, Li Cao4, Ross D. Crosby4. 1University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada. 2University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. 3Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, Canada. 4Sanford Health, Fargo, ND, USA


COGNITIVE BEHAVIOUR THERAPY VERSUS COMPASSION FOCUSED THERAPY FOR PATIENTS WITH EATING DISORDER WITH AND WITHOUT CHILDHOOD TRAUMA: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
KariAnne Vrabel1, Bruce Wampold1, Glenn Waller2, Ken Goss3, Asle Hoffart1, 4. 1Research Institute of Modum Bad, Vikersund, Norway. 2University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom. 3Coventry Eating Disorder Service, Birmingham, United Kingdom. 4University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway


PARALLEL PAPER SESSION IV: EPIDEMIOLOGY, COURSE, AND OUTCOME
Chicago 9


MORTALITY AND LONGER-TERM OUTCOME OF ANOREXIA AND BULIMIA NERVOSA IN MALES AS COMPARED TO FEMALES " WORK IN PROGRESS
Manfred M. Fichter1, 2, Norbert Quadflieg2. 1Schoen Klinik Roseneck, Prien, Germany. 2Psychiatrische Klinik der Universitat Munchen (LMU), Munchen, Germany


HOME TREATMENT:A NEW METHOD OF RELAPSE PREVENTION IN ADOLESCENT ANOREXIA NERVOSA (AN)
Beate M. Herpertz-Dahlmann1, Astrid Dempfle 2, Brigitte Dahmen1. 1Department of Child a Adolescent Psychiatry RWTH University, Aachen, Germany. 2Institute for Medical Statistics and Informatics Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel, Germany


ATTACHMENT AND MENTALIZATION AS PREDICTORS OF OUTCOME IN FAMILY THERAPY FOR ADOLESCENT ANOREXIA NERVOSA.
Tom Jewell1, 2, Lucy Serpell3, 4, Sarah Liston5, Kirsty Tahta-Wraith4, Alison Eivors5, Mima Simic2, Peter Fonagy3, Ivan Eisler2. 1King's College London, London, United Kingdom. 2South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom. 3University College London, London, United Kingdom. 4North East London NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom. 5Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust, Leicester


SELF-ASSESSMENT OF EATING DISORDER RECOVERY: ABSENCE OF EATING DISORDER PSYCHOPATHOLOGY IS NOT ESSENTIAL
Margarita C. Slof-Op 't Landt1, Alexandra E. Dingemans1, Jesus de la Torre Y Rivas2, Eric F. van Furth1, 3. 1Rivierduinen Eating Disorders Ursula, Leiden, Netherlands. 2Weet, Patient and Family Organization for Eating Disorders, IJsselstein, Netherlands. 3Department of Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands


TEMPERAMENT IN PRE-ADOLESCENCE IS ASSOCIATED WITH WEIGHT AND EATING PATHOLOGY IN YOUNG ADULTHOOD
Annelies E. van Eeden1, Hans W. Hoek1, 2, 3, Daphne van Hoeken1, Mathijs Deen1, Albertine J. Oldehinkel2. 1Parnassia Psychiatric Institute, The Hague, Netherlands. 2Department of Psychiatry, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands. 3Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY, USA

5:15 - 6:45 PM
POSTER SESSION
POSTER SESSION II
Chicago 8