Conference Program

Conference Program

Welcome! Please find the current preliminary program for EDRS 2019 listed below. Note that any aspect of this program is subject to change and the below program should not be considered final including presentation timings and poster numbers.


  Fri - Sep 06      Sat - Sep 07      Sun - Sep 08   


Saturday, September 7th

7:30 - 8:15 AM
PLENARY SESSION: OPEN SCIENCE PRACTICES IN EATING DISORDER RESEARCH: OPPORTUNITIES, CHALLENGES, AND POSSIBLE GUIDELINES
Chicago 9/10

Open Science is a global movement to increase the accessibility to scientific research in order to foster collaboration and innovation, increase scientific rigor and reproducibility, encourage data integration, and accelerate the translation of basic research into clinical practice. Increasingly, funders demand Open Science practices, and scientific journals are following suit. These requirements pose logistical burdens and raise ethical or intellectual property concerns. EDRS members should shape the future of Open Science in our field. Two brief talks will set the stage to engage EDRS attendees in a discussion of the Open Science framework and offer practical strategies for increasing transparency and reproducibility in eating disorder research. Weissman will introduce the Open Science framework, provide examples of specific rigor and reproducibility criteria, and summarize findings of a study of open science practices as reflected in manuscripts published in three eating disorder journals. An important component of Open Science is data sharing. Crosby, based on extensive collaborative experience across the globe, will share practical guidelines and tips regarding sharing data. The presenters then will facilitate audience discussion of how our field should address the opportunities and challenges arising from the Open Science movement and of possible guidelines for protecting investigators and participants from misuse or unintended consequences of open science practices.


PRACTICAL GUIDELINES FOR DATA SHARING IN THE ERA OF OPEN SCIENCE
Ross D Crosby. Sanford Research, Fargo, ND, USA

PRESSURES AND PRACTICES OF IMPLEMENTING OPEN SCIENCE FOR EATING DISORDER RESEARCHERS
Tom Hildebrandt. Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA

OPEN SCIENCE PRACTICES IN EATING DISORDER RESEARCH: INTRODUCTION AND STATUS REPORT
Ruth S. Weissman. Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT, USA
8:30 - 10:00 AM
SYMPOSIUM: NEW DIRECTIONS IN EATING DISORDERS TREATMENT RESEARCH
Chair/Organizer: Jennifer Wildes
Chicago 9/10

1
SHORT-TERM OUTCOMES OF A MULTI-CENTER RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF REFEEDING IN ANOREXIA NERVOSA: THE STUDY OF REFEEDING TO OPTIMIZE iNPATIENT GAINS (StRONG)
Andrea Garber. UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital, University of California

2
USING JUST-IN-TIME ADAPTIVE INTERVENTIONS TO ENHANCE COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL TREATMENT FOR BULIMIA NERVOSA
Adrienne Juarascio. Drexel University

3
COGNITIVE BIAS MODIFICATION TRAINING (CBM) AND TRANSCRANIAL DIRECT CURRENT STIMULATION (tDCS) TO TREAT EATING DISORDERS WITH BINGE EATING
Gemma Gordon. Kings College London

4
HARNESSING TECHNOLOGY FOR SCREENING AND INTERVENTION WITH EATING DISORDERS ON COLLEGE CAMPUSES: LONG-TERM OUTCOMES FROM A CLUSTER RANDOMIZED TRIAL AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS
Ellen Fitzsimmons-Craft. Washington University School of Medicine
10:00 - 10:30 AM
BREAK: COFFEE BREAK
Chicago Ballroom Foyer
10:30 - 12:00 PM
SYMPOSIUM: WHAT WE’RE MISSING IN EATING DISORDERS RESEARCH (AND PREVENTION, TREATMENT AND ADVOCACY): THE EPIDEMIOLOGIST’S PERSPECTIVE
Chair/Organizer: Alexis Duncan
Chicago 9/10

1
Many people with eating disorders dont receive treatment (and people with EDs who receive treatment are different from those who do not).
Ruth Weissman. Wesleyan University

2
Most people with eating disorders are not underweight, nor are they adolescent girls
Alexis Duncan. The Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis

3
The vast majority of people with eating disorders have other psychiatric disorders
Kristin von Ranson. University of Calgary

4
It is unlikely that the ED diagnostic criteria represent the truth
Alison Field. Brown University School of Public Health

5
The prevalence of eating disorders and disordered eating is much higher than we think
Katie Loth. University of Minnesota

6
Sub-diagnostic disordered eating matters
Dianne Neumark-Sztainer. University of Minnesota

7
You dont have to be a (mental) healthcare provider to do something about EDs
S. Bryn Austin. Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

8
Summary
Carly Pacanowski. University of Delaware

8
Discussion
Kendrin Sonneville. University of Michigan, School of Public Health
12:00 - 1:00 PM
KEYNOTE: KEYNOTE
Chair/Organizer: Scott Crow
Chicago 9/10

The New Paradigm of Computational Psychiatry
David Redish. University of Minnesota
1:00 - 2:15 PM
BREAK: LUNCH (ON YOUR OWN)
Chicago Ballroom Foyer
2:15 - 3:30 PM
PARALLEL PAPER SESSION: PARALLEL PAPER SESSION I: BINGE EATING AND OBESITY
Chair/Organizer: Debra Franko
Chicago 10

2:15
Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) Guided Self-Help for Binge-Eating Disorder (BED): A Randomized Controlled Trial
Jacqueline C. Carter1, Therese E. Kenny1, 2, Christopher W. Singleton1, Megan Van Wijk1, Olga Heath1. 1Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NL, Canada.2University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada

2:30
THE INTERACTIVE EFFECTS OF LOW TESTOSTERONE AND PROLONGED STRESS ON BINGE EATING SYMPTOMS IN MEN
Kristen M. Culbert, Megan M. Shope, Kimberly S. Stevens. Department of Psychology, University of Nevada - Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV, USA

2:45
PSYCHOPATHOLOGICAL NETWORKS IN COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL TREATMENTS FOR BINGE-EATING DISORDER
Anja Hilbert1, Andreas Mayr2, Stephan Herpertz3, Stephan Zipfel4, Brunna Tuschen-Caffier5, Hans-Christoph Friederich6, Martina de Zwaan7. 1University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.2University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.3University of Bochum, Bochum, Germany.4University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany.5University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.6University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf, Germany.7Hanover Medical School, Hanover, Germany

3:00
Exploring the Effectiveness of a Self-Control Training on Top of Inpatient Treatment, for Improving Weight Loss and Eating Behavior in Obese Youngsters
Tiffany Naets1, Leentje Vervoort1, Eline Vermeiren2, Annelies Van Eyck2, Ann Tanghe3, Caroline Braet1. 1Ghent University - Developmental, Personality and Social Psychology, Ghent, Belgium.2Antwerp University - Pediatrics, Antwerp, Belgium.3Zeepreventorium vzw, De Haan, Belgium

3:15
DIFFICULTY PUTTING ON THE BREAKS: NEURAL ACTIVATION DIFFERS BY BINGE EATING STATUS IN INDIVIDUALS WITH OBESITY WHEN ATTEMPTING TO INHIBIT RESPONSES TO FOOD
Megan N. Parker1, Helen B. Murray1, Stephanie M. Manasse3, Amani Piers1, Alexandra F. Muratore1, Michael R. Lowe1, Hasan Ayaz2, Adrienne S. Juarascio1, 3. 1Department of Clinical Psychology Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.2School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.3Center for Weight, Eating and Lifestyle Science (WELL Center), Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA

PARALLEL PAPER SESSION: PARALLEL PAPER SESSION II: DIETARY INTAKE AND BIOLOGY OF RESTRICTIVE EATING DISORDERS
Chair/Organizer: Kathleen Pike
Chicago 9

2:15
ALTERED MICRONUTRIENT LEVELS IN ANOREXIA NERVOSA: A PRELIMINARY STUDY ON THE POSSIBLE MEDIATING ROLE OF DNA METHYLATION
Linda Booij1, 2, 3, Jessica Burdo3, 4, Esther Kahan4, Luis B Agellon3, Lea Thaler3, 4, Kevin McGregor3, Aurelie Labbe5, Mimi Israel3, 4, Linda Wykes3, Howard Steiger 3, 4. 1Concordia University, Montreal, QC, Canada.2CHU Sainte-Justine Hospital, Montreal, QC, Canada.3McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.4Eating Disorders Program, Douglas Universsity Institute, Montreal, QC, Canada.5HEC Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada

2:30
Reduced Plasma Orexin-A Concentrations are Associated with Cognitive Deficits in Anorexia Nervosa
Fernando Fernandez-Aranda1, 2, 3, Trevor Steward1, 2, Gemma Mestre-Bach1, 2, Susana Jimenez-Murcia1, 2, 3, Roser Granero2, 4, Isabel Sanchez1, 2, Nadine Riesco1, 2, Cristina Vintro-Alcaraz1, 2, Zaida Aguera1, 2, Jose M. Menchon5. 1Department of Psychiatry, Bellvitge University Hospital-IDIBELL, Barcelona, Spain.2Ciber Fisiopatologia Obesidad y Nutricion, Instituto Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.3Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.4Departament de Psicobiologia i Metodologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.5CIBER Salud Mental, Instituto Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain

2:45
A DIET HIGH IN PROCESSED FOODS, TOTAL AND ADDED SUGARS, AND LOW IN PROTEIN IS CHARACTERISTIC OF YOUTH WITH AVOIDANT/RESTRICTIVE FOOD INTAKE DISORDER
Stephanie G Harshman1, 2, Olivia Wons1, 2, Madeline S Rogers1, 2, Alyssa M Izquierdo1, 2, Tara M Holmes3, Reitumetse L Pulumo1, 2, Elisa Asanza1, 2, Kamryn Eddy1, 2, 4, Madhusmita Misra1, Nadia Micali5, 6, 7, 8, Elizabeth A Lawson1, Jennifer J Thomas2, 4. 1Neuroendocrine Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.2Eating Disorders Clinical and Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.3Translational Clinical Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.4Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.5Departement universitaire de psychiatrie, Universite de Geneve, Geneva, Switzerland.6Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.7Service de psychiatrie de l'enfant et de l'adolescent, Geneva, Switzerland.8Department of Pediatrics, Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland

3:00
FAT PREFERENCE AND FAT INTAKE IN INDIVIDUALS WITH AND WITHOUT ANOREXIA NERVOSA
Janet E. Schebendach, Blair Uniacke, B. Timothy Walsh, Laurel E.S. Mayer, Evelyn Attia, Joanna Steinglass. NYS Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University Medical Center, NY, NY, USA

3:15
The role of frontostriatal circuits in restrictive food choice across the spectrum from illness to health
Joanna E Steinglass1, 2, Karin Foerde1, 2, Janet Schebendach1, 2, B. Timothy Walsh1, 2, Daphna Shohamy3. 1Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.2New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA.3Columbia University, New York, NY, USA
3:30 - 4:00 PM
BREAK: COFFEE BREAK
Chicago Ballroom Foyer
4:00 - 5:15 PM
PARALLEL PAPER SESSION: PARALLEL PAPER SESSION III: INTERVENTIONS
Chair/Organizer: Fernando Fernandez-Aranda
Chicago 10

4:00
ENHANCED COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY FOR ADOLESCENTS WITH ANOREXIA NERVOSA: OUTCOME AND PREDICTORS OF CHANGE
Riccardo Dalle Grave, Massimiliano Sartirana, Simona Calugi. Villa Garda Hospital, Garda (VR), Italy

4:15
Online Imaginal Exposure Therapy for Eating Disorders Decreases Eating Disorder Symptoms, Fear of Food, and Core Eating Disorder Fears
Cheri A Levinson, Caroline Christian, Shruti Shankar-Ram, Irina A Vanzhula, Leigh C Brosof, Lisa Michelson, Brebba Williams. University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA

4:30
IMPROVING PSYCHOLOGICAL OUTCOMES FOR CARERS OF ADULTS WITH ANOREXIA NERVOSA VIA A WEB-BASED SKILLS PACKAGE: A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Lucy E Spencer1, Juliane Schmidt-Hantke2, Karina Allen1, 5, Peter Musiat1, Rachel Potterton1, Gemma Gordon1, Franziska Hager2, Beintner Ina2, Bianka Vollert2, Barbara Nacke2, Dennis Gorlich3, Jennifer Beecham4, Eva-Maria Bonin4, Corinna Jacobi2, Ulrike Schmidt1, 5. 1King's College London, London, United Kingdom.2Technische Universitat Dresden, Dresden, Germany.3Wilhelms-Universitat Munster, Munster, Germany.4London School of Economics and Political Science, London, United Kingdom.5The Eating Disorders Service, Maudsley Hospital, London, United Kingdom

4:45
PROJECT RECOVER: RESULTS OF A FIRST RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF INTEGRATED COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL THERAPY FOR CO-OCCURRING EATING DISORDERS AND POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER
Kathryn Trottier1, 2, Candice Monson3, Stephen A. Wonderlich4, Li Cao4, Ross D. Crosby4. 1University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada.2University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.3Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, Canada.4Sanford Health, Fargo, ND, USA

5:00
Cognitive behaviourtherapy versus Compassion focused therapyfor patients with eating disorder with and without childhood trauma: A randomized controlled trial
KariAnne Vrabel1, Bruce Wampold1, Glenn Waller2, Ken Goss3, Asle Hoffart1, 4. 1Research Institute of Modum Bad, Vikersund, Norway.2University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom.3Coventry Eating Disorder Service, Birmingham, United Kingdom.4University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway

PARALLEL PAPER SESSION: PARALLEL PAPER SESSION IV: EPIDEMIOLOGY, COURSE, AND OUTCOME
Chair/Organizer: Anja Hilbert
Chicago 9

4:00
MORTALITY AND LONGER-TERM OUTCOME OF ANOREXIA AND BULIMIA NERVOSA IN MALES AS COMPARED TO FEMALES - WORK IN PROGRESS
Manfred M. Fichter1, 2, Norbert Quadflieg2. 1Schoen Klinik Roseneck, Prien, Germany.2Psychiatrische Klinik der Universitat Munchen (LMU), Munchen, Germany

4:15
HOME TREATMENT:A NEW METHOD OF RELAPSE PREVENTION IN ADOLESCENT ANOREXIA NERVOSA (AN)
Beate M. Herpertz-Dahlmann1, Astrid Dempfle 2, Brigitte Dahmen1. 1Department of Child a Adolescent Psychiatry RWTH University, Aachen, Germany.2Institute for Medical Statistics and Informatics Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel, Germany

4:30
ATTACHMENT AND MENTALIZATION AS PREDICTORS OF OUTCOME IN FAMILY THERAPY FOR ADOLESCENT ANOREXIA NERVOSA.
Tom Jewell1, 2, Lucy Serpell3, 4, Sarah Liston5, Kirsty Tahta-Wraith4, Alison Eivors5, Mima Simic2, Peter Fonagy3, Ivan Eisler2. 1King's College London, London, United Kingdom.2South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.3University College London, London, United Kingdom.4North East London NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.5Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust, Leicester

4:45
SELF-ASSESSMENT OF EATING DISORDER RECOVERY: ABSENCE OF EATING DISORDER PSYCHOPATHOLOGY IS NOT ESSENTIAL
Margarita C. Slof-Op 't Landt1, Alexandra E. Dingemans1, Jesus de la Torre Y Rivas2, Eric F. van Furth1, 3. 1Rivierduinen Eating Disorders Ursula, Leiden, Netherlands.2Weet, Patient and Family Organization for Eating Disorders, IJsselstein, Netherlands.3Department of Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands

5:00
TEMPERAMENT IN PRE-ADOLESCENCE IS ASSOCIATED WITH WEIGHT AND EATING PATHOLOGY IN YOUNG ADULTHOOD
Annelies E. van Eeden1, Hans W. Hoek1, 2, 3, Daphne van Hoeken1, Mathijs Deen1, Albertine J. Oldehinkel2. 1Parnassia Psychiatric Institute, The Hague, Netherlands.2Department of Psychiatry, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.3Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY, USA
5:15 - 6:45 PM
POSTER SESSION: POSTER SESSION II
Chicago 8

106
PREDICTING EATING BEHAVIORS FROM INTERNET DATA
Ellen E. Fitzsimmons-Craft1, Elad Yom-Tov2, Shiri Sadeh-Sharvit3.4, C. Barr Taylor4. 1Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA.2Microsoft Research, Herzliya, Israel.3Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya, Israel.4Palo Alto University, Palo Alto, CA, USA

107
EATING DISORDER-15 (ED-15): FACTOR STRUCTURE, PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES, AND CLINICAL VALIDATION
Paulo PP Machado, Tania Rodrigues, Ana R Vaz, Eva Conceicao. University of Minho, Braga, Portugal

108
EATING DISORDER QUESTIONAIRES SHORT FORMS: A COMPARISON
Paulo PP Machado1, Carlos Grilo2, Ross D Crosby3, 4. 1University of Minho, Braga, Portugal.2Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.3Sanford Research, Fargo, ND, USA.4University of North Dakota, Fargo, ND, USA

109
DIAGNOSTIC UTILITY OF BULIMIA NERVOSA AND BINGE EATING DISORDER SYMPTOMS IN MEN AND WOMEN
Karen S. Mitchell1, 2, Katherine M. Iverson1, 2. 1VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA.2Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA

110
Using Exploratory Data Mining to Identify Diagnostic Severity PRESENTATIONS for Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorder (OSFED)
Shelby N. Ortiz, Lauren N. Forrest, April R. Smith. Miami University, Oxford, OH, USA

111
Identifying research priorities for the study of atypical anorexia nervosa: a Delphi study
Christine M. Peat1, Mattias Strand2, Christopher Hubel2, 3, Johan K. Zvrskovec 2, Cynthia M. Bulik 1, 2. 1University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.2Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.3King's College London, London, United Kingdom

112
VISUAL MAPPING OF BODY IMAGE DISTURBANCE IN ANOREXIA NERVOSA
Christina Ralph-Nearman1, Armen C. Arevian2, Maria Puhl1, Alexandra Weindel1, 3, Scott E. Moseman4, Jamie D. Feusner2, Sahib S. Khalsa1, 3. 1Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, OK, USA.2Jane and Terry Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.3University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK, USA.4Laureate Eating Disorders Program, Tulsa, OK, USA

113
INTERVIEW-BASED ASSESSMENT OF AVOIDANT/RESTRICTIVE FOOD INTAKE DISORDER (ARFID) IN A CLINICAL AND NON-CLINICAL SAMPLE: EVALUATION OF THE ARFID-MODULE 2.0 FOR THE EATING DISORDER EXAMINATION
Ricarda Schmidt1, Franziska Schlensog-Schuster2, Andreas Hiemisch3, 4, Wieland Kiess3, 4, Anja Hilbert1. 1Integrated Research and Treatment Center AdiposityDiseases, Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, Leipzig University Medical Center, Leipzig, Germany.2Department of Paediatric Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Leipzig University Medical Center, Leipzig, Germany.3Leipzig University, LIFE Leipzig Research Center for Civilization Diseases, Leipzig, Germany.4Leipzig University Medical Center, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Center for Pediatric Research, Leipzig, Germany

114
Developing an Illness-Staging Framework for Anorexia Nervosa Via Expert Consensus
Joanna E Steinglass1, 2, Deborah R Glasofer1, 2. 1Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.2New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA

115
High Parent-Child Concordance in the Assessment of Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder: Inter-Rater Reliability of the Pica, ARFID, and Rumination Disorder Interview
Olivia B Wons1, Ani Keshishian 1, Jenny Jo1, Kendra Becker1, Lucy Cooke2, Madhusmita Misra1, Elizabeth Lawson1, Rachel Bryant-Waugh2, Kamryn Eddy1, Jennifer Thomas1, Nadia Micali3. 1Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.2University College London, London, United Kingdom.3Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland

116
THE CONTRIBUTION OF REWARD AND PUNISHMENT SENSITIVITY IN CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENCE TO THE ONSET OF EATING DISORDERS IN LATER ADOLESCENCE
Amy Harrison1, Marta Francesconi2, Eirini Flouri3. 1University College London, London, United Kingdom.2University College London, London, United Kingdom.3University College London, London, United Kingdom

117
Is volume of the pontocerebellum a predictor for weight restoration in anorexia nervosa?
Gabriella Franca Milos1, Juergen Haenggi 2, Volker Baur1, Lutz Jaencke2, Marco Piccirelli 3, Spyros Kollias3, Roland von Kaenel1, Chantal Martin-Soelch4, Lisa-Katrin Kaufmann1. 1University Hospital, Dep. Consultation-Liaison Psychiarty and Psychosomatic Medicine, Zurich, Switzerland.2University Zurich, Dep. Psychology, Div. Neuropsychology, Zurich, Switzerland.3University Hospital, Dep. Neuroradiology, Zurich, Switzerland.4University Fribourg, Dep. Psychology, Fribourg, Switzerland

118
HEART RATE VARIABILITY AND SYMPATHOVAGAL BALANCE AS A METRIC OF HEDONIC HUNGER
Alexandra F Muratore1, 2, Nicole Virzi1, Michael R Lowe1. 1Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.2Columbia University, New York, NY, USA

119
IS FEAR OF PHYSICAL PAIN ASSOCIATED WITH LIFETIME SUICIDE ATTEMPTS IN INDIVIDUALS WITH EATING DISORDERS?
Vi T. Nguyen, Lisa M. Anderson, Scott J. Crow, Carol B. Peterson, Emily M. Pisetsky. University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA

120
IMMUNE REGULATION OF FOOD CONSUMPTION AND HYPERACTIVITY IN THE ACTIVITY-BASED-ANOREXIA PARADIGM
Noga Or-Geva, Lawrence Steinman. Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA

121
AFFECTIVE LABILITY AND NEGATIVE URGENCY PREDICTING BINGE EATING
Anna Marie L. Ortiz, Heather A. Davis, Gregory T. Smith. University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA

122
IMPLICIT AND EXPLICIT MOTIVATIONAL RESPONSES TO HIGH- AND LOW-CALORIE FOOD IN RELATION TO BINGE EATING AND RESTRICTIVE EATING
Sarah E. Racine1, Leah Suissa-Rocheleau1, Shelby J. Martin2, Stephen D. Benning3. 1McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.2Ohio University, Athens, OH, USA.3University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV, USA

123
SEXUAL ORIENTATION CORRELATES WITH BASELINE CHARACTERISTICS BUT DID NOT MODERATE EFFECTS OF DISSONANCE-BASED EATING DISORDER PREVENTION PROGRAMS FOR WOMEN
Paul Rohde, Heather Shaw, Christopher Desjardins, Eric Stice. Oregon Research Institute, Eugene, OR, USA

124
BMI- AND NOT BMI-ASSOCIATED LONGITUDINAL GUT- MICROBIOME ALTERATIONS IN ADOLESCENT PATIENTS WITH ANOREXIA NERVOSA (AN)
Jochen Seitz1, Schulz Nina1, Belhouane Meriem2, Baines John2, 3, Dahmen Brigitte1, Herpertz-Dahlmann Beate1. 1Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Aachen, Germany.2Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Plon, Germany.3Institute for Experimental Medicine, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Kiel, Germany

125
CAREGIVER DEPLOYMENT, PARENTAL DISTRESS AND MEASURES OF GLYCEMIC HOMEOSTASIS IN ADOLESCENT MILITARY DEPENDENTS AT HIGH-RISK FOR EATING DISORDERS AND ADULT OBESITY
Lisa M. Shank1, 2, M K. Higgins Neyland1, 3, David A. Klein1, 3, Sarah Jorgensen1, 3, Tracy Sbrocco1, 3, William Leu Dakota Gillmore1, 3, Mary Quattlebaum Abigail Pine1, 3, Arielle Pearlman1, 3, Natasha A. Schvey1, 3, Cara H. Olsen1, 3, Mark Stephens3, 4, Denise E. Wilfley3, 5, Mark C. Haigney1, 2, Jack A. Yanovski3, 6, Jeffrey Quinlan1, 3, Marian Tanofsky-Kraff1, 2, 3. 1Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA.2Military Cardiovascular Outcomes Research Program, Bethesda, MD, USA.3Preventing Obesity in Military Communities-Adolescents, Bethesda, MD, USA.4College of Medicine, Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, PA, USA.5Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA.6Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA

126
EARLY PUBERTAL TIMING AND RISK FOR DISORDERED EATING IN YOUNG ADULT WOMEN: TESTING THE ROLE OF THE LEADING THEORIZED FACTORS
Megan M. Shope, Kristen M. Culbert. University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV, USA

127
PSYCHOLOGICAL CORRELATES OF WEIGHT VARIABILITY IN A SAMPLE OF WOMEN WITH BULIMIA NERVOSA
Simar Singh, Joanna Y. Chen, Michael Lowe. Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA

128
DIFFERENTIATING "ANXIETY ABOUT EATING" AND "WANTING TO EAT" HIGH VERSUS LOW ENERGY DENSE FOODS IN ANOREXIA NERVOSA
Kimberly R. Smith, Afroditi Papantoni, Lori Laddaran, Timothy H. Moran, Susan Carnell, Kellie Tamashiro, Angela Guarda. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA

129
ACCURACY OF EMPIRICALLY ESTABLISHED RISK FACTORS FOR PREDICTING FUTURE EATING DISORDER ONSET.
Eric Stice, Chris Desjardins. Oregon Research Institute, Eugene, OR, USA

130
GUT- MICROBIOME-BRAIN ALTERATIONS IN THE TRANSLATIONAL ABA ANOREXIA ANIMAL MODEL
Stefanie Trinh1, Anna Schloesser1, Constanze Schwenzer1, Clara Voelz1, Vanessa Kogel1, Cordian Beyer1, Beate Herpertz-Dahlmann2, Jochen Seitz2. 1Institute of Neuroanatomy, Aachen, Germany.2Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Aachen, Germany

131
APPROACH AND AVOIDANCE LEARNING IN ANOREXIA NERVOSA
Blair Uniacke1, Karin Foerde1, Zarrar Shehzad2, Nathaniel Daw3, Daphna Shohamy2, Joanna Steinglass1. 1Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA.2Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.3Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA

132
PUBERTY MODERATES THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN IMPULSIVITY, ANXIETY, DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS, AND BINGE EATING
Phuong T. Vo1, Natasha Fowler1, Sarah R. Racine2, S. Alexandra Burt1, Kelly L. Klump1. 1Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.2McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada

133
DOPAMINE BINDING POTENTIAL IN ADULT WOMEN WITH BINGE EATING BEHAVIORS: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY USING PET IMAGING
Hannah A Welch, Cara Bohon. Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA

134
HOW CHANGING LIFE ROLES PREDICT EATING DISORDER PATHOLOGY OVER 30-YEAR FOLLOW-UP
Madeline R Wick1, Tiffany A Brown2, Margaret C Walsh1, Elizabeth H Fitzgerald1, Pamela K Keel1. 1Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA.2University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA

135
Dorsomedial Prefrontal Cortex repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in Anorexia Nervosa: fMRI correlates of response: a pilot trial
Blake Woodside, Eileen Lam, Jonathan Downar. University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada

136
Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder caused by selective/neophobic (picky) eating: Disgust sensitivity, sensory processing, and impaired set-shifting as possible target mechanisms
Hana Zickgraf1, Gregory Wallace2, Terrence Dovey3. 1University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA.2George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA.3Brunel University, London, United Kingdom

137
NETWORK ANALYSIS OF BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER AND EATING DISORDER SYMPTOMS
Sarah Fischer, Jillian Nelson, James Thompson. George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, USA

138
Being afraid of gaining weight - the path from anxiety to anorexia nervosa through biased attention
Tanja Legenbauer1, Anne Radix1, Mike Rink2, Anca Sfaerla3, Belinda Platt3, Gerd Schulte-Korne3, Eni Becker2 . 1LWL University Hospital Hamm for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Ruhr-Uni Bochum, Hamm, Germany.2Clinical Psychology and Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmwegen, Netherlands.3University Hospital for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Ludwig Maximilian University Munich, Munich, Germany

139
EATING DISORDERS AND THE NINE SYMPTOMS OF BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS
Alexia E Miller, Vittoria Trolio, Amane Halicki-Asakawa, Sarah E Racine. McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada

140
COMORBIDITY OF EATING DISORDER PATHOLOGY AND ALCOHOL USE: A NETWORK ANALYSIS APPROACH
Melissa A. Munn-Chernoff1, Leigh C. Brosof2, Laura M. Thornton1, Jessica H. Baker1. 1Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.2Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA

141
EATING DISORDERS AND DIABETES RISK IN A SAMPLE OF INDIVIDUALS WITH FOOD INSECURITY
Maribel Plasencia1, Francesca Gomez2, Keesha Middlemass3, Carolyn Black Becker2. 1Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ, USA.2Trinity University, San Antonio, TX, USA.3Howard University, Washington, DC, USA

142
EATING DISORDERS AND POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW
Cleo Rijkers1, Maartje Schoorl1, 2, Daphne van Hoeken1, Hans W. Hoek1, 3, 4. 1Parnassia Psychiatric Institute, The Hague, Netherlands.2Department of Clinical Psychology, Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands.3Department of Psychiatry, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.4Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY, USA

143
USING NETWORK ANALYSIS TO IDENTIFY BRIDGE SYMPTOMS BETWEEN EATING DISORDERS AND SUICIDALITY
April Smith1, Lauren Forrest1, Mary Duffy2, Emily Pisetsky3, Jones Payton4. 1Miami Univesity, Oxford, OH, USA.2Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA.3University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.4Harvard, Boston, MA, USA

144
THE LONGITUDINAL PATTERN OF COMORBIDITY IN EATING DISORDERS: AN APPROACH USING SEQUENCE ANALYSIS
Sarah C. Van Alsten, Alexis E. Duncan. Washington University, St. Louis, Saint Louis, MO, USA

145
SIMILAR FUNCTIONS, DIFFERENT BEHAVIORS: NEW INSIGHTS INTO THE CO-OCCURRENCE OF EATING DISORDERS AND NONSUICIDAL SELF-INJURY
Shirley B Wang1, Kathryn R Fox1, Ann F Haynos2, Matthew K Nock1. 1Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA.2University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA

146
COMORBID TYPE 1 DIABETES AND DISTURBED EATING BEHAVIORS: PREVALENCE AND ASSOCIATION WITH METABOLIC CONTROL
Line Wisting1, 2, Torild Skrivarhaug2, 3, 4, 5, Knut Dahl-Jorgensen2, 3, 4, 5, Oyvind Ro1, 6. 1Regional Department for Eating Disorders, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.2Oslo Diabetes Research Centre, Oslo, Norway.3Department of Paediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.4Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.5The Norwegian Diabetic Centre, Oslo, Norway.6Institute of Clinical Medicine, Mental Health and Addiction, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway

147
IS THERE A RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MOTHERS' EMOTION SOCIALIZATION AND DAUGHTERS' EATING DISORDER PSYCHOPATHOLOGY? A MEDIATION STUDY BASED ON MOTHERS' REPORTS.
Karolina A. Rozworska1, Richard A. Young1, Daniel W. Cox1, Jennifer S. Coelho2, 1. 1University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.2British Columbia Children's Hospital, Provincial Specialized Eating Disorders Program for Children and Adolescents, Vancouver, BC, Canada

148
EATING DISORDER DISPARITIES AMONG SEXUAL AND GENDER MINORITY YOUTH: FINDINGS FROM THE ADOLESCENT BRAIN COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT (ABCD) STUDY
Natasha A. Schvey, Arielle T. Pearlman, Mikela Murphy, Joshua C. Gray. Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, MD, USA

149
DEVELOPING MOUSE MODELS TO IDENTIFY NOVEL THERAPEUTIC TARGETS FOR ANOREXIA NERVOSA
Lori M. Zeltser. Columbia University, New York, NY, USA

150
EMOTIONAL OVEREATING ACROSS THE CHILDHOOD YEARS
Pauline Jansen1, 2, Ivonne Derks1, 2, Robin Thomas1, 3, Vincent Jaddoe4, Manon Hillegers1, Henning Tiemeier5. 1Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands.2Department of Psychology, Education and Child Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands.3Department of Public Health, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.4Generation R Study Group, Rotterdam, Netherlands.5Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA

151
THE DIFFERENTIAL AND CUMULATIVE IMPACTS OF FIVE FORMS OF CHILD MALTREATMENT ON DISORDERED EATING BEHAVIOUR AMONG A REPRESENTATIVE SAMPLE OF CANADIAN YOUTH
Melissa Kimber1, Masako Tanaka1, Andrea Gonzalez1, Jennifer Couturier1, Tracie Afifi2, Harriet MacMillan1. 1McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.2University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada

152
HEALTH DISPARITIES IN EATING DISORDER PREVALENCE AND IMPAIRMENT BY GENDER AND SEXUAL IDENTITIES AND THEIR INTERSECTION
Melissa Simone, Autumn Askew, Katherine Lust, Marla Eisenberg, Emily Pisetsky. University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA

153
ANTECEDENTS AND CORRELATES OF NASOGASTRIC (NG) TUBE FEEDING DURING MEDICAL HOSPITALIZATION FOR ADOLESCENTS/YOUNG ADULTS WITH ANOREXIA NERVOSA
Meredith R. Kells1, 2, Susan Kelly-Weeder2, Andrea K. Garber3, Barbara E. Wolfe4. 1Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.2Boston College, Boston, MA, USA.3University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.4University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA

154
Medical Outcomes Among Inpatients Treated for Anorexia Nervosa after Bariatric Surgery
Wynne Lundblad2, Rachel P Kolko Conlon1, Alexis M Fertig2, Michele D Levine1, Marsha D Marcus1. 1University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.2Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

155
RECOVERY IN CONTEXT: HOW DO PRESENT MODELS OF RECOVERY FIT WITH THE EXPERIENCE OF THOSE WITH LIVED EXPERIENCE?
Therese E. Kenny, Stephen P. Lewis. University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada

156
'FEELING FAT' PREDICTS SPECIFIC EATING DISORDER SYMPTOM DIMENSIONS IN YOUNG MEN AND WOMEN
Adrienne Mehak, Sarah E. Racine. McGill University, Department of Psychology, Montreal, QC, Canada

157
IMPLICIT REGULATION IN EATING DISORDERS: A REVIEW
Georgios Paslakis1, 2, Anne Deborah Scholz-Hehn3, Laura Marie Sommer4, Simone Kuhn3. 1Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada.2Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.3University Medical Center, Hamburg-Eppendorf, Clinic and Policlinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Hamburg, Germany.4Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital of Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany

158
APPLICATION OF NETWORK ANALYSIS TO INVESTIGATE SEX DIFFERENCES IN INTERACTIVE SYSTEMS OF EATING DISORDER PSYCHOPATHOLOGY
Victoria L. Perko1, Kelsie T. Forbush1, Cynthia S. Q. Siew2, Jenna P. Tregarthen3. 1University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA.2University of Warwick, Coventry, United Kingdom.3Recovery Record Inc., Palo Alto, CA, USA

159
CLINICIANS AS A CRTICAL LINK: UNDERSTANDING CLINICIAN ATTITUDES AND ILLNESS PERCEPTIONS
Deborah L Reas1, 2, Rasmus Isomaa3, Kjersti Solhaug Gulliksen4, Johanna Levallius5. 1Regional Department for Eating Disorders, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo , Oslo, Norway.2Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.3Department of Social Services and Health Care, Jakobstad, Finland.4Journal for the Norwegian Psychological Association, Oslo, Norway.5Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden

160
EATING DISORDER PATIENT PRESENTATIONS AND OUTCOMES IN REPEAT INPATIENT HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS
Sarah Smith1, Blake Woodside1, 2. 1University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.2University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada

161
BODY IMAGE AND EATING PATHOLOGY IN FASHION INDUSTRY STUDENTS AND PROFESSIONALS
Kristin M. von Ranson, Hilary Herman, Emilie Lacroix. Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada

162
OPEN SCIENCE PRACTICES IN TREATMENT STUDIES PUBLISHED IN EATING DISORDER JOURNALS BETWEEN 2016 AND APRIL 2019: AN EXAMINATION OF THREE JOURNALS
RUTH S. WEISSMAN, SIMONE JOHN-VANDERPOOL. Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT, USA

163
The role of depressive symptoms in decision making across patients with anorexia nervosa, somatic symptom disorder, unipolar and bipolar depressive disorder
Unna N. Danner1, Sabrina S. Schroder1, Annemarie A. van Elburg1, Eline J. Regeer2, Pieter Dingemanse3, Saskia A.M. van Broeckhuysen4. 1Altrecht Eating Disorders Rintveld, Zeist, Netherlands.2Altrecht Bipolar, Utrecht, Netherlands.3Altrecht Mood Disorders, Utrecht, Netherlands.4Altrecht Psychosomatic Medicine Eikenboom, Zeist, Netherlands

164
GENDER-RELATED PATTERNS OF EMOTION REGULATION AMONG PATIENTS WITH EATING DISORDERS
Susana Jimenez- Murcia1, 2, 3, Zaida Aguera1, 2, 4, Georgios Paslakis2, Lucero Munguia3, Isabel Sanchez2, Roser Granero1, 5, Jessica Sanchez-Gonzalez2, Trevor Steward1, 2, Fernando Fernandez-Aranda1, 2, 3. 1CIBER Fisiopatologia Obesidad y Nutricion (CIBERobn), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Barcelona, Spain.2Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital of Bellvitge-IDIBELL, Barcelona, Spain.3Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.4Department of Public Health, Mental Health and Maternal-Child Nursing, School of Nursing, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.5Departament de Psicobiologia i Metodologia de les Ciencies de la Salut, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain

165
VALIDATION OF THE EATING DISORDERS AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY QUESTIONNAIRE (EADBS-Q) FROM THE EATING DISORDERS EXAMINATION BARIATRIC SURGERY VERSION (EDE-BSV)
Yael Latzer1, Inbal Globus2, James E. Mitchell3, Jeon D. Hamm4, Rafah T. Chaudhry4, Musya Herzog4, Harry R. Kissileff4. 1Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences, Haifa University, Haifa, Israel.2Faculty of Public health, Haifa University, Haifa, Israel.3Neuropsychiatric Research Institute, Fargo, ND, USA.4Obesity Nutrition Research Center Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA

166
NEGATIVE URGENCY MEDIATES THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN NEGATIVE EMOTIONALITY AND EATING DISORDER PSYCHOPATHOLOGY IN WOMEN WHO BINGE EAT
Chantelle A Magel, Kristin M von Ranson. University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada

167
LOW EMOTION DIFFERENTIATION: AN AFFECTIVE RISK FACTOR FOR BINGE EATING?
Megan E. Mikhail1, Pamela K. Keel2, S. Alexandra Burt1, Michael Neale3, Steven Boker4, Kelly L. Klump1. 1Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.2Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA.3Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.4University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA

168
UNDERSTANDING THE EXPERIENCES AND TRIGGERS OF BINGE EATING AND OBESITY TO INFORM THE DESIGN OF A MOBILE INTERVENTION
Sarah W. Neubert1, Jennifer E. Wildes 2, Sean A. Munson 3, Madhu Reddy 1, David C. Mohr 1, Andrea K. Graham 1. 1Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.2University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.3University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA

169
SEXUAL AND GENDER MINORITY STATUS AND ACADEMIC DISTRESS ASSOCIATED WITH SUICIDE ATTEMPTS IN STUDENTS WITH EATING DISORDERS
Emily M Pisetsky, Melissa Simone, Katherine Lust. University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA

170
NEGATIVE EFFECTS OF TRETAMENT AMONG PATIENTS WITH EATING DISORDERS- A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY
Oyvind Ro1, 2, Tonje Granne Kvale2, Elisabeth Veseth Kristoffersen2. 1Department for Eating Disorders, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.2Insitute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway

171
Experiences of fear of fat and desire for thinness in young women with body image concerns: A qualitative analysis
Rachel F Rodgers1, 2, Laura E Fischer1, Katherine Laveway1, Kristen Laws1, Joyce Chen1, Eric TH Bui3, 4. 1APPEAR, Department of Applied Psychology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA.2Department of Psychiatric Emergency a Acute Care, CHRU Montpellier, Montpellier, France.3Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.4Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

172
ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN WEIGHT-BASED TEASING AND DISORDERED EATING BEHAVIORS AMONG YOUTH
Sarah G. Rubin1, Natasha A. Schvey2, Lisa M. Shank1, 2, Manuela Jaramillo1, 2, Deborah R. Altman1, 2, Sophie Ramirez1, Elisabeth K. Davis1, Sarah LeMay-Russell1, 2, Meghan E. Byrne1, 2, Sheila M. Brady1, Miranda M. Broadney1, Nichole R. Kelly3, Marian Tanofsky-Kraff1, 2, Jack A. Yanovski1. 1Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA.2Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA.3University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, USA

173
BODY SATISFACTION PREDICTS POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE AFFECT: AN ECOLOGICAL MOMENTARY ASSESSMENT STUDY.
Margarita Sala1, Jennifer A. Linde2, Ross D. Crosby3, Carly R. Pacanowski4. 1Connecticut VA - West Haven, West Haven, CT, USA.2University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.3Neuropsychiatric Research Institute, Fargo, ND, USA.4University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA

174
THE ROLE OF AFFECT IN THE MAINTENANCE OF BINGE-EATING DISORDER WITH AND WITHOUT HEIGHTENED OVERVALUATION OF WEIGHT AND SHAPE: EVIDENCE FROM AN ECOLOGICAL MOMENTARY ASSESSMENT STUDY
Lauren M. Schaefer1, Kathryn E. Smith1, 2, Lisa M. Anderson3, Li Cao1, Ross D. Crosby1, 2, Scott G. Engel1, Scott J. Crow3, 4, Carol B. Peterson3, 4, Stephen A. Wonderlich3, 4. 1Sanford Research, Fargo, ND, USA.2University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Fargo, ND, USA.3University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.4The Emily Program, St. Paul, MN, USA

175
INTOLERANCE OF UNCERTAINTY AND COMPULSIVE EXERCISE: EVIDENCE FOR THE IMPORTANCE OF A TRANSDIAGNOSTIC MECHANISM IN RELATION TO PROBLEMATIC EXERCISE BEHAVIORS
Christina Scharmer1, Erin E Reilly2, Sasha Gorrell3, Courtney Breiner1, Drew A Anderson1. 1University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY, USA.2University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA.3University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA

176
Delay discounting in anorexia nervosa: Trait anxiety is associated with preference for larger later caloric restriction rewards
Colleen C Schreyer1, Meredith S Berry2, Jennifer L Hansen1, Angela S Guarda1. 1Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.2University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

177
Determinants of Food Choice in a Large Typical Sample
Zarrar Shehzad1, Karin Foerde2, 3, Akram Bakkour4, Alice M Xue4, Naomi Assaf2, B Timothy Walsh2, 3, Daphna Shohamy1, 4, Joanna E Steinglass2, 3. 1Zuckerman Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.2Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.3Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA.4Department of Psychology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA

178
ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN EATING DISORDER SYMPTOMS, EMPLOYMENT STATUS, AND OCCUPATIONAL FUNCTIONING AMONG FEMALE VETERANS
Megan E Sienkiewicz1, 2, Katherine M Iverson1, 2, 3, Karen S Mitchell1, 2, 3. 1National Center for PTSD, Boston, MA, USA.2VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA.3Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA

179
TYPES OF SOCIAL COMPARISON AND MALE BODY ATTITUDES AMONG MEN WITH AND WITHOUT A HISTORY OF AN EATING DISORDER
Katherine A Thompson, TJ Raney, Anna M. Bardone-Cone. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA

180
MULTI-METHOD EVIDENCE FOR A DUAL-PATHWAY PERSPECTIVE ON LOSS OF CONTROL OVER EATING AMONG ADOLESCENTS
Eva Van Malderen1, Lien Goossens1, Sandra Verbeken1, Eva Kemps2. 1Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.2Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia

181
Evidence for the Replicability of Eating Disorder Psychological Networks in Five Samples: Conceptual and Methodological Considerations
Irina A Vanzhula1, Caroline Christian1, Payton Jones2, Leigh C Brosof1, Kelsey Forbush3, Kathryn Smith4, Jenna Tregarthen5, Cheri A Levinson1. 1University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA.2Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA.3The University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA.4Sanford Research, Fargo, ND, USA.5Recovery Record, Palo Alto, CA, USA

182
WEIGHTCONCERN AS A MEDIATOR OF EARLY CHANGE IN GUIDED SELF-HELP FOR BULIMIC DISORDERS
Ana R Vaz1, Eva Conceicao1, Celia Moreira2, Antonio Neves3, Jennifer Santos3, Paulo PP Machado1. 1University of Minho, Braga, Portugal.2University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.3Santa Maria Hospital, Lisbon, Portugal

183
IMPLICIT BODY DISSATISFACTION PREDICTS DISORDERED EATING BEHAVIORS
Elizabeth A Velkoff, April R Smith. Miami University, Oxford, OH, USA

184
Feasibility and effectiveness of adding a cognitive Bias modification Training to a residential childhood obesity treatment " pilot studies.
Sandra Verbeken1, Caroline Braet1, Lien Goossens1, Katrijn Houben2, Julie Latomme3, Tom Loeys4, Ellen Moens1, Tiffany Naets1, Wouter Boendermaker5. 1Department of Developmental, Personality and Social Psychology, Ghent University, Gent, Belgium.2Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands.3Department of Movement and Sports Sciences, Ghent University, Gent, Belgium.4Department of Data Analysis, Ghetn University, Gent, Belgium.5Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands

185
Anorexia Nervosa: Does low weight help to suffer less from ones trauma?
Maartje S. Vroling1, 2, Suzanne H. W. Mares1, Ger P. J. Keijsers2. 1GGNet Amarum, Zutphen a Nijmegen, Netherlands.2Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, Netherlands

186
PERCEIVED SOCIAL SUPPORT IN STAGES OF EATING DISORDER RECOVERY
Emily C. Walsh, Anna M. Bardone-Cone. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA

187
PARENTAL FUNCTIONING AND CHILD FEEDING PRACTICES AMONG MOTHERS WITH EATING AND WEIGHT DISORDER HISTORIES
Hannah A Welch1, Shiri Sadeh-Sharvit2, Cristin D Runfola3, Elise L Gibbs3, Caroline E Dickens1, James D Lock3, Debra L Safer3. 1PGSP-Stanford Psy.D. Consortium, Palo Alto, CA, USA.2Baruch Ivcher School of Psychology, Herzliya, Israel.3Stanford University Dept of Psychiatry a Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA, USA

188
AFFECTIVE DYNAMICS IN THE EATING DISORDERS
Gail A. Williams-Kerver1, Stephen A. Wonderlich1, 2, Ross D. Crosby1, 2, Li Cao1, Kathryn E. Smith1, Scott G. Engel1, Scott J. Crow3, Carol B. Peterson3, James E. Mitchell1, 2, Daniel Le Grange4. 1Sanford Research, Fargo, ND, USA.2University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Fargo, ND, USA.3Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.4Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA

189
BODY DISSATISFACTION AND FOOD ADDICTION AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS: MEDIATING ROLE OF EATING EXPECTANCIES
Ya-Ke Wu1, 2, Catherine Zimmer3, Melissa A. Munn-Chernoff2, Jessica H. Baker2. 1The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.2The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of Psychiatry a UNC Center of Excellence for Eating Disorders, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.3The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of Sociology a The Odum Institute, Chapel Hill, NC, USA

190
Deserving of Love and Passion
Ada H Zohar1, 2. 1Ruppin Academic Center, Emek Hefer, Israel.2Lior Zfaty Center for the Prevention of Suicide and Mental Pain, Emek Hefer, Israel

191
GENDER AND SEXUAL MINORITY INDIVIDUALS ENTER HIGHER LEVELS OF EATING DISORDER SPECIALTY CARE WITH MORE SEVERE EATING DISORDER SYMPTOMS ANDGREATER FREQUENCIES OFTRAUMA-RELATED RISK FACTORS
Janell L. Mensinger1, Janeway L. Granche1, Shelbi Cox2, Jennifer Henretty2. 1Drexel University, Dornsife School of Public Health, Philadelphia, PA, USA.2Center for Discovery, Discovery Behavioral Health, Los Alamitos, CA, USA

192
USING AN EMPIRICALLY DERIVED CLASSIFICATION OF CHILD ABUSE TO EXAMINE PROSPECTIVE ASSOCIATIONS OF ABUSE WITH EATING DISORDERS DEVELOPING IN YOUNG ADULTHOOD
Hannah N. Ziobrowski1, Stephen L. Buka1, Adam J. Sullivan2, S. Bryn Austin3, 4, Nicholas J. Horton5, Alison E. Field1, 6. 1Department of Epidemiology, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI, USA.2Department of Biostatistics, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI, USA.3Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard University T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.4Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine, Boston Childrenrs Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.5Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Amherst College, Amherst, MA, USA.6Department of Pediatrics, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA

193
PREDICTORS AND MODERATORS OF TREATMENT OUTCOME IN A RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL FOR ADULTS WITH BINGE-EATING DISORDER
Lisa M. Anderson1, Kathryn M. Smith2, Lauren M. Schaefer2, Ross D. Crosby2, 3, Li Cao2, Scott G. Engel2, 3, Scott J. Crow1, 4, Stephen A. Wonderlich2, 3, Carol B. Peterson1, 4. 1University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.2Sanford Center for Biobehavioral Research, Fargo, ND, USA.3University of North Dakota, Fargo, ND, USA.4The Emily Program, Minneapolis, MN, USA

194
FAMILY-BASED TREATMENT FOR CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH EATING DISORDERS: A MIXED METHODS EVALUATION OF A BLENDED EVIDENCE-BASED IMPLEMENTATION APPROACH
Jennifer Couturier1, Melissa Kimber1, Melanie Barwick2, Tracy Woodford1, Gail McVey2, Sheri Findlay1, Cheryl Webb1, Alison Niccols1, James lock3. 1McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.2University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.3Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA

195
Identifying trajectories of change in eating disorder psychopathology and mental health during outpatient treatment
J.A. de Vos1, 2, M. Radstaak2, E.T. Bohlmeijer2, G.J. Westerhof2. 1Stichting Human Concern, centrum voor eetstoornissen, Amsterdam, Netherlands.2Twente University, department of Psychology, Health a Technology, Enschede, Netherlands

196
THE DEVELOPMENT OF A CHATBOT FOR THE PREVENTION OF EATING DISORDERS
Ellen E Fitzsimmons-Craft1, Naira W Topooco2, 3, William Chan3, 4, Marie-Laure Firebaugh1, Arielle Smith1, Burkhardt Funk5, Nicholas C Jacobson6, Shiri Sadeh-Sharvit7, Denise E Wilfey1, C Barr Taylor3, 4. 1Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Psychiatry, St. Louis, MO, USA.2Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linkoping, Sweden.3Palo Alto University, Center for m2Health, Palo Alto, CA, USA.4Stanford University, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA, USA.5Leuphana University of Luneburg, Luneburg, Germany.6Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Boston, MA, USA.7Baruch Ivcher School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya, Israel

197
DOES EXPERIENCING CARE AS COLLABORATIVE ENHANCE INPATIENT EATING DISORDERS TREATMENT OUTCOME?
Josie Geller1, 2, Lindsay Samson1, Nadia Maiolino1, Suja Srikameswaran1. 1St. Paul's Hospital Eating Disorders Program, Vancouver, BC, Canada.2Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

198
INCREASED MINDFULNESS PREDICTS IMPROVEMENTS IN HEDONIC EATING AND GLUCOSE METABOLISM FOLLOWING A MINDFULNESS-BASED INTERVENTION (MBI) IN ADOLESCENT GIRLS AT RISK FOR TYPE 2 DIABETES (T2D)
Lauren D Gulley1, Lauren B Shomaker1, 2, 3, Shelly K Annameier1, Jordan Quaglia4, Kirk Warren Brown5, Patricia Broderick6, Christopher Bell7. 1Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA.2Department of Community and Behavioral Health, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO, USA.3Section of Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA.4Department of Contemplative Psychology, Naropa University, Boulder, CO, USA.5Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.6Edna Bennett Pierce Prevention Research Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.7Department of Health and Exercise Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA

199
The effect of using imagery rescripting of autobiographical memories versus imagery rescripting of intrusive images in core beliefs and eating disorder symptoms
Fortesa Kadriu1, 2, Laurence Claes1, Cilia Witteman2, Julie Krans2. 1KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.2Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands

200
PREDICTORS OF EARLY IMPROVEMENTS IN ACCESS TO EMOTION REGULATION STRATEGIES DURING INTENSIVE TREATMENT
Danielle E. MacDonald1, 2, Kathryn Trottier1, 2. 1Centre for Mental Health, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada.2Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

201
INVESTIGATING EARLY RESPONSE TO TREATMENT IN A MULTI-SITE STUDY FOR ADOLESCENT BULIMIA NERVOSA
Brittany Matheson1, Sasha Gorrell2, Cara Bohon1, W. Stewart Agras1, Daniel Le Grange2, 3, James Lock1. 1Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.2University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA, USA.3The University of Chicago (Emeritus), Chicago, IL, USA

202
CHANGING SELF-PERCEPTIONS IN EATING DISORDERS
Carrie J McAdams1, 2, Susan Mericle1, Bethany Hunt1, Jessica A Harper1, Whitney Smith Hagan1. 1UT Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX, USA.2Children's Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA

203
MOTIVATION VERSUS PSYCHOEDUCATION-INFUSED DAY HOSPITAL TREATMENT FOR EATING DISORDERS
Jennifer S. Mills1, Gillian Kirsh2, Jacqueline Hogue1. 1York University, Toronto, ON, Canada.2North York General Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada

204
COMPARISON OF TWO MAINTENANCE TREATMENTS FOR ANOREXIA NERVOSA 12 MONTHS FOLLOWING INTENSIVE TREATMENT
Marion P Olmsted1, 2, Danielle E MacDonald1, 2. 1University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada.2University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

205
PRELIMINARY EFFICACY OF PEER MENTORSHIP IN OUTPATIENTS WITH ANOREXIA NERVOSA, BULIMIA NERVOSA, OR BINGE EATING DISORDER
Lisa Ranzenhofer, Kaitlin Sanzone, Annabella Hochschild, Elisabeth Larson, B.Timothy Walsh, Evelyn Attia. Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA

206
RANDOMIZED-CONTROLLED TRIALS ON THE EFFECTS OF MUSIC IN PEOPLE WITH OR AT RISK FOR EATING DISORDERS
Francesca Testa1, 2, Sarah Arunachalam2, Annette Heiderscheit, 3, Hubertus Himmerich1, 4. 1Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology a Neuroscience, Kingrs College London, London, United Kingdom.2Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.3Department of Music Therapy, Augsburg University, Minneapolis, MN, USA.4South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom

207
PATIENT AND THERAPIST PERCEPTIONS OF AUTONOMY SUPPORT: RELATIONSHIPS TO CLIENT MOTIVATION AND EATING DISORDER TREATMENT OUTCOME
Lea Thaler1, 2, Chloe Paquin-Hodge1, 2, Audrey Mariamo1, Maria Tuntisi3, Annie St-Hilaire1, 2, Esther Kahan1, Mimi Israel1, 2, Howard Steiger1, 2, 3. 1Eating Disorders Continuum, Douglas University Institute, Montreal, QC, Canada.2Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.3Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada

208
INPATIENT TREATMENT FOR ADOLESCENTS WITH SEVERE BULIMIA NERVOSA: CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE AND PREDICTORS OF TREATMENT OUTCOME
Ulrich Voderholzer1, 2, Silke Naab1, Markus Fumi1, Sandra Schlegl2. 1Schoen Clinic Roseneck, Prien, Germany.2University Hospital, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Munich, Germany

209
TRANSDIAGNOSTIC COGNITIVE REMEDIATION THERAPY FOR PATIENTS WITH EATING DISORDERS: A PROTOCOL FOR A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Siri Weider1, 2, Tora Thorsrud1, 2, Camilla L. Dahlgren3. 1Department of Psychology, the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.2Specialised Unit for Eating Disorder Patients, Department of Psychiatry, Levanger Hospital, Health Trust Nord-Trondelag, Levanger, Norway.3Regional Department for Eating Disorders, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval HF, Oslo, Norway